Influence of elevation and forest type on community assemblage and species distribution of shrews in the central and southern Appalachian mountains

  • Authors: Ford, W. Mark; McCay, Timothy S.; Menzel, Michael A.; Webster, W. David; Greenberg, Cathryn H.; Pagels, John F.; Merritt, Joseph F.
  • Publication Year: 2005
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: The international Society of Shrew Biologists, 1: 303-315

Abstract

We analyzed shrew community data from 398,832 pitfall trapnights at 303 sites across the upper Piedmont, Blue ridge, northern Ridge and Valley, southern Ride and Valley, Cumberland Plateau and Allegheny Mountains and Plateau sections of the central and southern Appalachian Mountains from Alabama to Pennsylvania. The objectives of our research were to describe regional species distributions and to identify macro-environmental factors important to shrews at both the community and individual species scales. Our study documented the presence of nine species with a low of three in the southern Ridge and Valley section to a high of eight in the Blue ridge section were the Appalachian, Austral and Boreomontane fauna elements converge. Region-wide, shrew species richness was related to increasing elevation and was higher in mesic forest types than in xeric types. conformity to expected distribution of shrew body-size (small, medium, and large) appropriate for the central and southern Appalachian species pool showed no relationship to elevation gradients.

  • Citation: Ford, W. Mark; McCay, Timothy S.; Menzel, Michael A.; Webster, W. David; Greenberg, Cathryn H.; Pagels, John F.; Merritt, Joseph F. 2005. Influence of elevation and forest type on community assemblage and species distribution of shrews in the central and southern Appalachian mountains. The international Society of Shrew Biologists, 1: 303-315
  • Posted Date: December 14, 2006
  • Modified Date: December 14, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.