Site disturbances associated with alternative prescriptions in an upland hardwood forest of northern Alabama

  • Authors: Carter, Emily; Rummer, Robert B.; Stokes, Bryce
  • Publication Year: 1997
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Proceedings: 1997 ASAE [American Society of Agricultural Engineers] annual international meeting; 1997 August 10-14; Minneapolis, MN. St. Joseph, MI: American Society of Agricultural Engineers; 975013: 18p.

Abstract

A study was installed in an upland hardwood forest to evaluate the site impacts associated with three alternative prescriptions --- clearcut, deferment cut, and strip cut. Two methods of site impact assessment were employed: 1) assignment of disturbance classes to selected points within each treatment area; and 2) measurement of soil bulk density, gravimetric water content, and soil strength at points previously evaluated for soil disturbance class. Clearcut and deferment cut treatments produced the greatest impacts, as evidenced by higher percentage of slightly and highly disturbed areas and increases in bulk density and soil strength. Strip cut treatments had less impact on a stand-wide basis but cut strips experienced similar impacts.

  • Citation: Carter, Emily; Rummer, Robert B.; Stokes, Bryce 1997. Site disturbances associated with alternative prescriptions in an upland hardwood forest of northern Alabama. Proceedings: 1997 ASAE [American Society of Agricultural Engineers] annual international meeting; 1997 August 10-14; Minneapolis, MN. St. Joseph, MI: American Society of Agricultural Engineers; 975013: 18p.
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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