The use and application of phylogeography for invertebrate conservation research and planning

This article is part of a larger document. View the larger document here.

  • Authors: Garrick, Ryan C.; Sands, Chester J.; Sunnucks, Paul
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: General Technical Report (GTR)
  • Source: Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-93. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 15-22

Abstract

To conserve evolutionary processes within taxa as well as local co-evolutionary associations among taxa, habitat reservation and production forestry management needs to take account of natural genetic-geographic patterns. While vertebrates tend to have at least moderate dispersal and gene flow on a landscape-scale, there are good reasons to expect many small, flightless, ecologically specialized saproxylic invertebrates to be strongly subdivided owing to low powers of dispersal, long-lived stable microhabitats and multiple generations within a single log. Phylogeographic studies have repeatedly demonstrated that, in low vagility taxa, (1) traditional morphological taxonomy underestimates genetic diversity, (2) conservation strategies focused at and above the species-level are inadequate, and (3) it is not atypical for sedentary invertebrates to exhibit high local endemism over very fine spatial scales. Phylogeography and comparative phylogeography provide an empirical framework for maximizing the conservation benefit of reserves, and directing conservation strategies and sustainable management practices outside of protected areas.

  • Citation: Garrick, Ryan C.; Sands, Chester J.; Sunnucks, Paul. 2006. The use and application of phylogeography for invertebrate conservation research and planning. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-93. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. pp. 15-22
  • Posted Date: October 31, 2006
  • Modified Date: November 17, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.