Persistence and efficacy of termiticides used in preconstruction treatments to soil in Mississippi

  • Authors: Mulrooney, J.E.; Davis, M.K.; Wagner, T.L.; Ingram, R.L.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: J. Econ. Entomol., Vol. 99(2): 469-475

Abstract

Laboratory and field studies were conducted to determine the persistence and efficacy of termiticides used as preconstruction treatments against subterranean termites. Bifenthrin (0.067%), chlorpyrifos (0.75%), and imidacloprid (0.05%) ( [AI]; wt:wt) were applied to soil beneath a monolithic concrete slab at their minimum labeled rates. Soil samples were taken from three depths (0-2.5, 2.6-7.6, and 7.7-15.2 cm) at six sampling times (0,3, 6,9, 12 and 48 mo) from sites in Harrison and Oktibbeha counties in Mississippi. Residue analyses were conducted on the 0-2.5- and 2.6-7.5-cm depths, and bioassays were conducted using all three depths. In field studies, significant termiticide degradation occurred between sampling times 0 and 48 mo for all termiticides. At all sampling times, the top 2.5 cm of soil contained more termiticide than the other depths. Time to 50% dissipation of termiticide in the 0-2.5-cm depth was 9,6, and 2 mo for bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, and imidacloprid, respectively. Termite mortalities in contact bioassays remained high for bifenthrin and chlorpyrifos throughout the 48-mo sampling period; however, mortality of termites exposed to imidacloprid-treated soil dropped after the initial sampling. Termites readily penetrated all termiticide-treated soil in bioassays of 52-mm soil cores at 48 mo. Percentage of mortality in these bioassays was 15,43, and 13 for bifenthrin, chlorpyrifos, and imidacloprid respectively.

  • Citation: Mulrooney, J.E.; Davis, M.K.; Wagner, T.L.; Ingram, R.L. 2006. Persistence and efficacy of termiticides used in preconstruction treatments to soil in Mississippi. J. Econ. Entomol., Vol. 99(2): 469-475
  • Keywords: termiticide, residue, toxicity
  • Posted Date: September 29, 2006
  • Modified Date: February 10, 2021
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.