A tale of two towns: black and white municipalities respond to urban growth in the South Carolina lowcountry

  • Authors: Johnson, Cassandra Y.; Floyd, Myron F.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Human Ecology Review, Vol. 13(1), p. 23-38

Abstract

Sea Islands off the South Carolina coast have experienced rapid development rates in the past half century. This trend is now impacting the rural Lowcountry (coastal) near Charleston, SC. A better understanding of traditional rural communities' responses to expanding urbanization is critical because of the obvious threat to the natural environment in rural areas and also because of the potential threat to the culture and value systems held by long-time residents. This exploratory, qualitative study examines the response of two municipalities to growth. Majority black "Newborn" has initiated legislative actions that may encourage growth and is much more receptive to development initiatives. In contrast, mostly white "Seaside Village" is strongly opposed to proposals that may result in development. The bifurcated town responses are theorized in terms of procedural justice and sense of place.

  • Citation: Johnson, Cassandra Y.; Floyd, Myron F. 2006. A tale of two towns: black and white municipalities respond to urban growth in the South Carolina lowcountry. Human Ecology Review, Vol. 13(1), p. 23-38
  • Keywords: urban sprawl, environmental justice, Gullah
  • Posted Date: April 11, 2006
  • Modified Date: November 29, 2006
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