Designing forest vegetation management strategies based on the mechanisms and dynamics of crop tree competition by neighbouring vegetation

  • Authors: Balandier, P.; Collet, C.; Miller, James H.; Reynolds, P.E.; Zedaker, S.M.
  • Publication Year: 2006
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Forestry 79(1):3-27

Abstract

Plant interactions can be defined as the ways plants act upon the growth, fitness, survival and reproduction of other plants, largely by modifying their environment. These interactions can be positive (facilitation) or negative (competition or exploitation). During plantation establishment or natural forest regeneration after a disturbance, high light levels and, sometimes, increased availability of water and nutrients favour the development of opportunistic, fast-growing herbaceous and woody species which capture resources at the expense of crop trees. As a consequence, the growth and survival of crop trees can be dramatically reduced. Although the effects of this competition are well documented, the physical and physiological mechanisms of competition are not. Moreover, the competition process is never constant in time or space. We present a conceptual competition model based on plant growth forms common in global forests, i.e. graminoids, forbs, small shrubs, large shrubs and mid-storey trees, and main-storey trees. Their competitive attributes and successional dynamics are examined. An overview is presented on the way forest vegetation management (FVM) treatments influence these components and outcomes regarding crop tree performance and diversity conservation. Finally, a synthesis of literature yields FVM guidelines for efficiently optimizing crop tree performance and safeguarding diversity. Future research needs to further sustainable FVM are presented.

  • Citation: Balandier, P.; Collet, C.; Miller, James H.; Reynolds, P.E.; Zedaker, S.M. 2006. Designing forest vegetation management strategies based on the mechanisms and dynamics of crop tree competition by neighbouring vegetation. Forestry 79(1):3-27
  • Posted Date: February 3, 2006
  • Modified Date: May 3, 2007
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.