Exotic ecosystems: where root disease is not a beneficial component of temperate conifer forests

  • Authors: Otrosina, William J.
  • Publication Year: 2003
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Forest Pathology: From genes to landscapes, Chapter 13

Abstract

Forest tree species and ecosystems ahve evolved under climatic, geological, and biological forces over eons of time. The present flora represents the sum of these selective forces that have acted upon ancestral and modern species. Adaptations to climatic factors, soils, insects, diseases, and a host of disturbance events, operating at a variety of scales, ahve forged the characteristics of each tree species we now observe, including their functions in forest ecosystems. Thus, modern flora is adapted to the conditions existing at present. The stochastic and inexorable nature of climatic, geological, and biological selective forces becomes more striking when we consider that possibly 99% of all species that ever existed are not extinct (Raup 1986).

  • Citation: Otrosina, William J. 2003. Exotic ecosystems: where root disease is not a beneficial component of temperate conifer forests. In: Forest Pathology: From genes to landscapes, Chapter 13
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
  • Print Publications Are No Longer Available

    In an ongoing effort to be fiscally responsible, the Southern Research Station (SRS) will no longer produce and distribute hard copies of our publications. Many SRS publications are available at cost via the Government Printing Office (GPO). Electronic versions of publications may be downloaded, printed, and distributed.

    Publication Notes

    • This article was written and prepared by U.S. Government employees on official time, and is therefore in the public domain.
    • Our online publications are scanned and captured using Adobe Acrobat. During the capture process some typographical errors may occur. Please contact the SRS webmaster if you notice any errors which make this publication unusable.
    • To view this article, download the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader.