Tip moth parasitoids and pesticides: Are they compatible?

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  • Authors: McCravy, Kenneth W.; Dalusky, Mark J.; Berisford, C. Wayne
  • Publication Year: 1999
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Proceedings of an informal Conference The entomological Society of America, Annual Meeting, December 12-16, Atlanta, Georgia, eds. Berisford, C. Wayne; Grosman, Donald M., 26-33

Abstract

Effects of herbicide and insecticide applications on parasitism of the Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock) were examined in 2-yr-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations in Georgia. Total parasitism rates varied significantly among tip moth generations, but there were no differences in parasitism rates between herbicide-treated and untreated plots. Significant differences in the relative abundance of parasitoid species were found among generations, with Eurytoma pini Bugbee being the most common in summer and Lixophaga mediocris Aldrich the most abundant in spring. Plots treated with the insecticide, Orthene, had significantly less parasitism than plots treated with tebufenozide, Bacillus thuringiensis var. kursfaki, or untreated check plots. Effects of acephate treatments were species-specific, with no apparent effects on parasitism by L. mediocris Aldrich but significantly decreased parasitism by Haltichella rhyacioniae Gahan.

  • Citation: McCravy, Kenneth W.; Dalusky, Mark J.; Berisford, C. Wayne 1999. Tip moth parasitoids and pesticides: Are they compatible?. In: Proceedings of an informal Conference The entomological Society of America, Annual Meeting, December 12-16, Atlanta, Georgia, eds. Berisford, C. Wayne; Grosman, Donald M., 26-33
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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