Use of pheromone traps to predict infestation levels of the nantucket pine tip moth: Can it be done?

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  • Authors: Asaro, Christopher; Berisford, C. Wayne
  • Publication Year: 1999
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: In: Proceedings of an Informal Conference The Etomological Society of America, Annual Meeting, December 12-16, Atlanda, Georgia, eds. Berisford, C. Wayne; Grosman, Donald M., p. 1-7

Abstract

Pheromone traps baited with synthetic baits are used in southeastern pine plantations to monitor the phenology of the Nantucket pine tip moth (Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock)) for timing of insecticide applications. Trap catches of tip moths have been difficult to interpret because they decrease considerably relative to population density from the spring through subsequent generations. Understanding this pattern is important for optimizing trap usage and catch interpretation. Decreased adult longevity during summer was demonstrated and suggested as the primary reason for low catches in hot weather. In addition, methods were developed to utilize pheromone traps for predicting future population density and damage by this pest. Trap catch was strongly correlated with tip moth density and damage within generations. Additionally, trap catch of overwintering moths was a strong predictor of tip moth damage during the subsequent generation.

  • Citation: Asaro, Christopher; Berisford, C. Wayne 1999. Use of pheromone traps to predict infestation levels of the nantucket pine tip moth: Can it be done?. In: Proceedings of an Informal Conference The Etomological Society of America, Annual Meeting, December 12-16, Atlanda, Georgia, eds. Berisford, C. Wayne; Grosman, Donald M., p. 1-7
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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