Effects of Soil Compaction and Organic Matter Removal on Morphology of Secondary Roots of Loblolly Pine

  • Authors: Walkinshaw, Charles H.; Tiarks, Allan E.
  • Publication Year: 1998
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Proceedings of the Ninth Biennal Southern Silvilcultural Research Conference

Abstract

Root studies are being used to monitor possible changes in growth of loblolly pines on a long-term soil productibity study site. Here, we report the results of a preliminary look sat roots in the sizth growing season. Roots were collected from loblly pines gorwn in soil that was first subjected to three levels of compaction )none, moderate, severe) and three levels of organic matter removal) stem only, total tree, and total aboveground biomass). Roots were fixed sectioned, and stained for examination by light microscope. The proportion of roots with bark formation decreased from 70 percent in uncompaceted soil to 43 percent in severely compacted soil. Depletion of starch graings was significantly less in samples from uncompacted sil than in compacted soil.

  • Citation: Walkinshaw, Charles H.; Tiarks, Allan E. 1998. Effects of Soil Compaction and Organic Matter Removal on Morphology of Secondary Roots of Loblolly Pine. Proceedings of the Ninth Biennal Southern Silvilcultural Research Conference
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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