Using Biomass to Improve Site Quality and Carbon Sequestration

  • Authors: Stokes, Bryce J.; Sanchez, Felipe G.; Carter, Emily A.
  • Publication Year: 1998
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Proceedings of IEA Bioenergy Task 18 Workshop Developing Systems for Integrating Bioenergy into Enviromentally Sustainable Forestry Sept. 1998

Abstract

The future demands on forest lands are a concern because of reduced productivity, especially on inherently poor sites, sites with long-depleted soils, or those soils that bear repeated, intensive short rotations. Forests are also an important carbon sink and, when well managed, can make even more significant contributions to sequestration and to reduction of greenhouse gases. This paper looks at the use of forest biomass as a carbon sink and as a source of nutrients for enhancing or restoring site productivity. It is hypothesised that wood incorporated into the soil wiil store carbon for an unknown length of time, and an example analysis using logging residues is presented. A field study was also conducted to evaluate the use of mulching and tilling as site preparation tools for incorporating biomass into the soil.

  • Citation: Buford, Marilyn A.; Stokes, Bryce J.; Sanchez, Felipe G.; Carter, Emily A. 1998. Using Biomass to Improve Site Quality and Carbon Sequestration. Proceedings of IEA Bioenergy Task 18 Workshop Developing Systems for Integrating Bioenergy into Enviromentally Sustainable Forestry Sept. 1998
  • Keywords: carbon, nutrients, site preparation, biomass
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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