Effects of Temperature and Adult Diet on Development of Hypertrophied Fat Body in Prediapausing Boll Weevil (Coleoptera Curculionidae)

  • Authors: Wagner, Terence L.; Villavaso, Eric J.
  • Publication Year: 1999
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Annals of the Entomoligical Society of America Vol. 92, no. 3 pgs. 403-413 May 1999

Abstract

This study examines the effects of temperature and adult diet on the development of hypertrophied fat bodies in prediapausing adult boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman. Simulation models derived from this work are used to estimate the minimal ages at which male and female boll weevils exhibit diapause morphology, based on conditions in north Mississippi. The models assume that temperature is the principal independent variable regulating fat body development, that food is not limited, and, once the internal characteristics of diapause are expressed, that the weevil will leave the field in search of overwintering quarters. The information derived from the simulations was used to propose spray intervals for diapause control.

  • Citation: Wagner, Terence L.; Villavaso, Eric J. 1999. Effects of Temperature and Adult Diet on Development of Hypertrophied Fat Body in Prediapausing Boll Weevil (Coleoptera Curculionidae). Annals of the Entomoligical Society of America Vol. 92, no. 3 pgs. 403-413 May 1999
  • Keywords: Anthonomus grandis grandis, adult prediapause development, cotton, simulation model
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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