Long- and short-term flooding effects on survival and sink-source relationships of swamp-adapted tree species

  • Authors: Angelov, M.N.; Sung, Shi-Jean S.; Doong, R.L.; Harms, W.R.; Kormanik, Paul P.; Black, C.C.
  • Publication Year: 1995
  • Publication Series: Miscellaneous Publication
  • Source: Tree Physiology 16:477-484.

Abstract

About 95% of swamp tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica var. biflora (Walt.) Sarg.) And sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) seedlings survived continuous root flooding for more than two years, whereas none of the swamp chestnut oak (Quercus michauxii Nutt.) And cherrybark oak (Q. falcata var. pagodifolia Ell.) Seedlings survived one year of flooding.Flooding caused increases in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) specific activity in taproot cambial tissues and increases in starch concentrations of swamp tupelo seedlings that were reversed when seedlings were removed from flooding.Flooding had little effect on soluble sugar concentrations in swamp tupelo or sweetgum.Based on seedling survival and the sink-source relationships, the order of flood tolerance was: swamp tupelo > sweetgum > swamp chestnut oak > cherrybark oak.

  • Citation: Angelov, M.N.; Sung, Shi-Jean S.; Doong, R.L.; Harms, W.R.; Kormanik, Paul P.; Black, C.C. 1995. Long- and short-term flooding effects on survival and sink-source relationships of swamp-adapted tree species. Tree Physiology 16:477-484.
  • Posted Date: April 1, 1980
  • Modified Date: August 22, 2006
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