Our mission: To provide the basic biological and ecological knowledge and innovative management strategies required for management and control of native and non-native insect pests, disease pathogens and invasive plants in changing forest ecosystems.

Welcome to the Southern Research Station’s Insects, Diseases, and Invasive Plants Research Work Unit website. Our mission is to provide the basic biological and ecological knowledge and innovative management strategies required for management and control of native and non-native insect pests, disease pathogens and invasive plants in changing forest ecosystems. Learn more about us →

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Newsletter
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Latest issue of Southern Forest Health Newsletter: Fall 2018

In this issue: SRS 4552 Update from the Project Leader, Coarse woody debris in longleaf pine stands, Role of Agrilus macer in sugarberry decline, Odor discrimination among bark beetles, Tracking laurel wilt disease in sassafras, Jim Meeker awarded Regional Forester Honor, Camcore partnerships highlighted in Columbia, Field tour highlights hemlock silviculture, Thomas Whitney wins graduate student award, Technology Transfer.

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News & Events

Hemlock Seedlings Released from Shade

“Eastern hemlock is a shade-tolerant species,” says USDA Forest Service research entomologist Bud Mayfield. “But extra sunlight may help it survive HWA infestation.” Extra sunlight equals fewer HWA, at least on potted hemlock seedlings grown under shade cloth.


Definitive New Book on Saproxylic Insects

“About a third of all forest insect species are saproxylic,” says USDA Forest Service research entomologist Michael Ulyshen.

Ulyshen recently edited a definitive new book called Saproxylic Insects: Diversity, Ecology and Conservation and wrote four chapters.


Presentation: The Diversity, Conservation and Ecological Importance of Saproxylic Insects

Approximately one third of all forest insect species worldwide depend directly or indirectly on dying or dead wood (i.e., saproxylic) and these organisms are known to be sensitive to forest management decisions. The loss of saproxylic insect diversity in Europe due to reductions in the amount of dead wood and old trees across the landscape serves as a cautionary tale for researchers and land managers working in other parts of the world. This presentation will provide a broad overview of these insects, their conservation and the ecosystem services they provide, with a focus on the southeastern United States.

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