Heat and Acid Could Squeeze Trout Out of Southern Appalachian Streams

A newly published research study that combines effects of warming temperatures from climate change with stream acidity projects average losses of around 10 percent of stream habitat for coldwater aquatic species for seven national forests in the southern Appalachians – and up to a 20 percent loss of habitat in the Pisgah and Nantahala National…  More 

Faces of the Forest Service: Bill Hargrove

Bill Hargrove likes to wear “loud” shirts, as he describes them—playful prints that reflect the colors and shapes of the natural world as well as a sense of humor that’s hard to match. But it isn’t just his shirts that cause Hargrove to stand out in a crowd. His big ideas and passion for taking…  More 

SRS Celebrates Pollinator Week 2015

On June 18, the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) celebrated National Pollinator Week by inviting community members and Station employees to a self-guided interpretive garden stroll through the SRS People’s Garden located at Station headquarters in Asheville, North Carolina. The pollinator garden features native flowering plants that provide nectar, pollen, and habitat to…  More 

Boy Scouts Volunteer in SRS Pollinator Garden

On Saturday, April 11, Ben Chambers turned 15. He spent his birthday leading a group of 20 Boy Scouts in installing seven permanent sign posts and creating a new seating area in the U.S. Forest Service People’s Garden at the Southern Research Station (SRS) in Asheville, North Carolina. The garden has been a highly collaborative project…  More 

Flowers on the Forest Floor: Herbaceous Contributions to Ecosystem Processes

Plant diversity in eastern U.S. forests comes not only from trees, but from the ferns, wildflowers, and other herbaceous plants on the forest floor.  Some researchers have found that as much as 90 percent of plant diversity is due to these understory species. “Until recently, not much was known about the role these plants play…  More 

Making a Start on Restoring Hemlocks to the Southern Appalachians

This winter, in collaboration with the North Carolina State University (NCSU) Camcore program, the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) established plots for the first phase of research to support restoring hemlocks to the forest stands in the southern Appalachians they’ve disappeared from. Andy Tait, NCSU-Camcore research assistant based at SRS, coordinated the planting…  More 

Student Scientists Present Research at Coweeta Laboratory

At the U.S. Forest Service Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory (Coweeta) in Otto, North Carolina, scientists investigate patterns of weather and climate and the impact that climate change is having on southeastern forests. Recently, 50 fifth graders from the nearby Macon County Mountain View Intermediate (MVI) School presented their own weather research projects at the laboratory, which…  More 

Jennifer Knoepp Named Soil Science Society of America Fellow

U.S. Forest Service scientist Jennifer Knoepp was recently selected as a Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) Fellow for 2014.  Fellow is the highest recognition bestowed by SSSA, an international scientific society whose more than 6,000 members are dedicated to advancing the field of soil science and fostering the transfer of knowledge and practices to…  More 

Young Forests Can Benefit Wildlife

It’s easy to think of forests as peaceful, unchanging places. In reality, this isn’t the case, because forests are much more dynamic than they may seem. In fact, forests are shaped by change, and many forest ecosystems depend upon it. In the aftermath of a major change or disturbance like wildfire or human clearing of…  More 

Learning about the Importance of Proper Road Construction

“It is ironic that roads designed to help people enjoy the Appalachians often destroy the beautiful scenery and clear water that make the mountains so attractive. Poorly constructed access roads often cause severe erosion, and stream sedimentation. These effects can degrade water quality for decades. Erosion can be disastrous in fragile mountain environments, and the…  More