Unexpected Pest of Chestnut Trees

SRS research entomologist Bud Mayfield was relieved to find that defoliation on an American chestnut planting site was not as severe as expected. Mayfield and SRS research forester Stacy Clark are coauthors on a paper in the Journal of Insect Science that describes a study they conducted with Ashley Case, an adjunct lecturer at the University…  More 

A New View of the Forest Canopy of the Smokies

Researchers working at the U.S. Forest Service Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center office in Asheville, North Carolina, are just a short drive away from one of the most biodiverse places on the planet: the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which straddles 800 square miles of western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee. Although they and…  More 

Bad News for the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Over the past decade, the hemlock woolly adelgid, a tiny insect, has ravaged the hemlocks of Southern Appalachia, causing widespread death of the trees that once lined mountain streams throughout the region. Efforts to keep hemlocks alive include releasing insects that feed on the hemlock woolly adelgid, including the Laricobius beetle featured in a recent…  More 

Eastern White Pine: Estimating Survival and Timber Value

Eastern white pine has grown in the eastern U.S. for millennia, but by the late 1800s, most of the old growth stands had been logged. When forestry in the U.S. emerged during the 1890s, white pine was one of the first species to be replanted, and was one of the main species Gifford Pinchot and…  More 

Forest Service Helps School Enhance Environmental Education Project

The U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) recently awarded $23,000 in grant funds to help develop an Outdoor Environmental Classroom at Carpenters Elementary School in Blount County, Tennessee. The environmental classroom is a16-acre tract adjacent to the school that volunteers began to transform into an outdoor environmental learning area five years ago. James (J.T.)…  More 

Where’s the Ginseng?

Newly published research by the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) demonstrates that co-managing eastern hardwood forests for timber and non-timber forest products could boost local economies while helping conserve biodiversity. SRS scientist Jim Chamberlain worked with Michael McGufffin, president of the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) and Virginia Tech associate professor Stephen Prisley…  More 

Invasive Earthworms, No Joke

Earthworms, the darlings of gardeners, fishers and composters, have a dark side: some are globetrotters and when introduced to new homes can cause real problems, both above and below ground. “Invasive earthworms are a global problem and can cause considerable changes to ecosystems,” says Mac Callaham, research ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research…  More 

The Latest on Tennessee Forests

  Tennessee Forests, 2009, a new resource bulletin published by the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS), provides results from the eighth complete survey of Tennessee’s forest resources, showing that forests continue to cover about half of the states 26 million acres with a slight gain in forest land during the period 2005 to…  More