Remembering Bill Boyer, Mr. Longleaf

Dr. William D. (Bill) Boyer, known to many as “Mr. Longleaf,” died on April 13th after a long illness. Boyer’s early research on and advocacy for the Escambia Experimental Forest, his enthusiasm and commitment to long-term studies on establishing longleaf pine, and his leadership in promoting the use of prescribed fire to promote longleaf pine…  More 

Appalachian-Cumberland Highlands: The Next 50 Years

Knowing more about how the future might unfold can improve decisions that have long-term consequences. The Southern Forest Futures Project, a multi-agency effort led by the U.S. Forest Service, aims to forecast and interpret changes in southern forests under multiple scenarios over the next several decades. The first of five sub-regional reports to explore these…  More 

SRS Researchers Awarded Grants for Research on White Nose Syndrome

U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) researchers and collaborators just received news that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) funded two of their proposals on white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that affects hibernating bats. One grant funds research on bat survival, while the other helps set up a program to monitor bats nationwide.…  More 

A New Crew of Young Firefighters

As you read this, members of the Davidson River Initial Attack Crew are out fighting a wildfire or helping conduct a prescribed fire to reduce fuel or restore a forest ecosystem. The team of young men from across the United States recently completed their training under a unique advanced fire management program provided by the U.S.…  More 

Long-Term Research on Fire Ecology in the Southern Appalachians

Scientists with the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) Upland Hardwoods Ecology and Management unit recently received a grant from the Joint Fire Sciences Program to continue a study on the long-term effects on wildlife of using prescribed fire and mechanical fuel reduction treatments in upland hardwood forests. The study is on the southern Appalachian…  More 

Wildland Fire in the Appalachians Conference

The Consortium of Appalachian Fire Managers and Scientists and the Association for Fire Ecology are hosting a conference October 8 -10, 2013, at the Hotel Roanoke and Conference Center in downtown Roanoke, Virginia. Wildland Fire in the Appalachians: Discussions Among Managers and Scientists is designed for anyone with an interest in wildland fire in the…  More 

Shortleaf Pine: A Species Slipping Away?

Both shortleaf and loblolly pine are native to the southeastern United States, where the two species have coexisted and occasionally hybridized for millennia. Historically, hybrids were rare. In the 1950s hybrids made up just 3 percent of the pines in shortleaf stands, but since then their numbers have skyrocketed. Today, just two or so generations…  More 

Field Day Inspires Landowners in the Western Longleaf Pine Range

A field day and workshop held on May 23rd at the U.S. Forest Service Kisatchie National Forest Ranger District office near Natchitoches, Louisiana is among the first ventures to spark landowner interest in longleaf pine along the western edge of this species’ historic range. Longleaf pine technology transfer efforts in the West are led by…  More 

Fire Research: A Hot Topic

For centuries landowners in the southern Appalachians have used fire as a tool to clear land, control insects, encourage forage, and eliminate unwanted vegetation. But little is known about how fire affects regeneration of oak or other hardwood trees, and how it can be used to meet specific management or restoration goals for upland hardwood…  More 

Indiana Bats and Prescribed Fire

A two-day workshop held in western North Carolina provided research results to forest and natural resource managers concerned about maintaining summer habitat for the endangered Indiana bat. Attended by over 60 people from federal and state agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and a private consultant, the workshop focused on identifying summer maternity habitat for the species in…  More