Inaugural Green Line Meeting

On April 26, foresters, scientists, executives, and other personnel from the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS), National Forests of North Carolina, and the Francis Marion-Sumter National Forest in South Carolina, gathered in Asheville, NC for the inaugural Green Line meeting. The meeting was modeled after the State Line meetings, which provide state forestry…  More 

Women in Science: Stacy Clark

The new Women in Science series features women scientists from across the Southern Research Station (SRS)–their education, career paths, challenges, achievements, and inspirations. Meet SRS scientist Stacy Clark, a research forester with the Upland Hardwood Ecology and Management Research Unit in Knoxville, Tennessee. She received a B.S. from the University of Tennessee in Forest Management and…  More 

Women in Science: Viniece Jennings

The new Women in Science series features women scientists from across the Southern Research Station (SRS)–their education, career paths, challenges, achievements, and inspirations. Meet SRS scientist Viniece Jennings, a research scientist with the Integrating Human and Natural Systems Research Unit in Athens, Georgia. Jennings’ research helps people understand the connections between green spaces and physical, mental,…  More 

Women in Science: Susan Loeb

The new Women in Science series features women scientists from across the Southern Research Station (SRS)–their education, career paths, challenges, achievements, and inspirations. Meet SRS scientist Susan Loeb, a research ecologist with the Upland Hardwood Ecology and Management Research Unit in Clemson, South Carolina. Loeb earned her Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of California, Davis and has studied…  More 

Women in Science: Susie Adams

The Southern Research Station (SRS) has the distinction of having employed the first woman research forester in the U.S. Forest Service. It was 1930 when Margaret Stoughton Abell began her pioneering work with what was known then as the Appalachian Forest Experiment Station (the precursor to the SRS). Today the number of women working in…  More 

Recruiting the Next Generation of Leaders

On January 9 and 10, deans, department chairs, and career services coordinators from 12 southeastern universities gathered at the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) in Asheville, NC. They were joined by executives, researchers, foresters, human resources professionals, and others from SRS and the Southern Region. The purpose of the meeting was to share…  More 

Serra Hoagland’s Milestone Achievements

Serra Hoagland, biological scientist with the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS), graduated from Northern Arizona University (NAU) in May with a Ph.D. in forestry. In addition to receiving her Ph.D., she received the honor of being the first Native American to receive a doctoral degree in forestry from NAU, and is only the third…  More 

A Graduation Milestone and a Special Gift Honor a Father’s Wisdom

Throughout her life, Serra Hoagland’s father has told her, “When a door opens, don’t be afraid to walk through.” Back in 2011, when Serra had just received her Master’s degree in Environmental Science and Management from the University of California, Santa Barbara, she traveled to Minnesota to attend the Intertribal Timber Council’s (ITC) annual symposium.…  More 

Landscape Ecology Meeting Draws Forest Service Scientists and Record Attendance

After more than a year of planning, local organizers from the U.S. Forest Service Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center were thrilled to finally welcome attendees of the annual meeting of the U.S. International Association for Landscape Ecology (US-IALE), held last month in Asheville, North Carolina. It was the 29th annual and the largest ever…  More 

Panelists Bring “WoW” Factor to Women’s Workplace Challenges and Solutions

In your day-to-day life, what obstacles prevent you from achieving your goals at work? Upon reflection, each person may have a different and personal response to this question. When posed to a group of women with common work environments, some similar challenges emerge. Three professionals from The Wildlife Society’s “Women of Wildlife” (WoW) committee engaged…  More