Forest and Landowners Workshop Held in Mississippi

On May 3, 2016 the Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) and Minority Landowner Magazine co-hosted a forest and landowners workshop in Meridian, Mississippi. About 70 people, including landowners, extension agents, university staff, and consulting foresters, participated in the free workshop. The goals of the workshop were to: Introduce minority and limited resource landowners to…  More 

The Tallahatchie Experimental Forest

  The Tallahatchie Experimental Forest (Tallahatchie), located in the Holly Springs National Forest near Oxford, Mississippi, was created in 1950. Much of the experimental forest lies within the floodplain of the Little Tallahatchie River; upland parts of the forest include the headwaters of two watersheds, one draining into the Little Tallahatchie River, the other into…  More 

Pondberry Seed Fate: Animal Dispersers, Animal Predators

Although pondberry can still be found in nine southern states, it is vanishingly rare. “Pondberry is an endangered species,” says Andreza Martins. “In most states, only one or two populations of the shrub are known to exist.” Currently a forest engineer in Brazil, Martins interned at the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) in 2005…  More 

The Harrison Experimental Forest

Located in the lower Coastal Plain in southeastern Mississippi, the Harrison Experimental Forest (Harrison) was established on the Desoto National Forest in 1934. By that time, vast stands of southern pines, mostly longleaf pine, had been cut from the estimated 31 million acres that made up the southern Coastal Plain forest. Located just north of…  More 

Faces of Innovation: Gayle Henderson

Gayle Henderson, an Information Technology Specialist with the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) in Oxford, Mississippi, has seen extensive changes in the information technology realm. When she first began working for the Forest Service 28 years ago, the Oxford unit had only two HP terminals they used to access the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) mainframe.…  More 

Forests of Mississippi, 2014

The U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station recently published Forests of Mississippi, 2014, which provides an overview of forest resources in Mississippi based on inventory conducted by the SRS Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) unit in cooperation with the Mississippi Forestry Commission. The estimates in the update are for measurement year 2014 with comparisons made…  More 

Bringing Bottomland Forests Back to the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

The vast Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV) that stretches along the Mississippi River from southern Illinois to the Gulf of Mexico once supported 24 million acres of bottomland and wetland forest — rich stands of oak, gum, ash, hickory, baldcypress, and water tupelo. The hydrology of the original floodplain was drastically altered by flood-control levees built…  More 

Invasive Tallowtree Widespread in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley and Gulf Coast

Nonnative, invasive plant species pose a threat to forest resources throughout the South. Increasingly, nonnative plants infiltrate landscapes, eroding and replacing native plant communities. This can have irreversible and degrading effects on critical, human-sustaining ecosystems. Tallowtree (Triadica sebifera) is one of the most pervasive exotic tree species in the South and is known to replace entire stands…  More 

Mississippi Alluvial Valley Forests: The Next 50 Years

The Southern Forest Futures Project (SFFP) started in 2008 as an effort to study and understand the various forces reshaping the forests across the 13 states of the Southeast. Chartered by the U.S. Forest Service Southern Region and Southern Research Station (SRS) along with the Southern Group of State Foresters, the project examined a variety…  More 

The Status of Ash Species in Selected Southern States

A new Science Update  from the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) provides the latest data on ash tree (Fraxinus spp.) species in Alabama, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The emerald ash borer, an introduced Asian beetle species first detected in Michigan in 2002, has spread throughout the northeastern U.S. and into the southern states…  More