Kudzu’s Entanglement of South Begins to Unravel

Kudzu, the nightmare weed that gobbled the South, is disappearing. Slowly, inexorably, the scientists, foresters, farmers and goats — yes, goats — are gaining the upper hand on the slinky, creepy green vine that makes abandoned homes and utility poles disappear seemingly overnight. Kudzu’s decline is difficult for a Southerner to grasp. Drive down that…  More 

Kudzu: The Guest That Just Won’t Leave

Spring is right around the corner, and in the South, “all eyes turn to kudzu as it awakes,” says James Miller, research ecologist (emeritus) for the U.S. Forest Service Insects, Diseases, and Invasive Plants unit. Introduced to United States at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia, kudzu was touted as a quick-growing ornamental vine with…  More 

Can the Kudzu Bug Stop the Vine That Ate the South?

Southern Research Station (SRS) entomologist Jim Hanula may be the only person in the South who actually wants to keep kudzu alive. He needs healthy plots of the famous weed to monitor the effect the bean plataspid—a pest that entered Georgia some two years ago and has become known as the kudzu bug—is having on…  More 

Keeping Kudzu at Bay

Accidentally introduced insect shows promise in battle with kudzu In October 2009, Dan Suiter, an entomologist with the University of Georgia (UGA), noticed large numbers of an unidentified insect in and around kudzu fields in northeast Georgia. This turned out to be the first recorded sighting of the bean plataspid  aka “kudzu bug“ (Megacopta cribraria) in…  More