Hemlock Holding Its Own For Now at the Landscape Level

Despite ongoing destruction by the non-native invasive hemlock woolly adelgid, hemlock forests in the eastern United States appear to be holding their own for now, according to findings by U.S. Forest Service researchers recently published in the journal Biological Invasions. The key word is “appear,” said Talbot Trotter, the study’s lead author and a research…  More 

Loss of Eastern Hemlock Will Affect Forest Water Use

Eastern hemlock grows in streamside areas throughout the southern Appalachian Mountains, where it is a keystone species. Because of its dense evergreen foliage, constant year-round transpiration (loss of water from needles) rate,  and dominance in riparian and cove habitats,  eastern hemlock plays an important role in the area’s water cycle, and regulates stream flow year…  More 

Managing For Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

The nonnative invasive insect hemlock woolly adelgid is taking its toll on eastern hemlock trees in the Southern Appalachian region of the United States, where the tree often serves as a foundation or keystone species along mountain streams. A new article by U.S. Forest Service researchers covers the latest in control strategies for hemlock woolly…  More 

What Comes After Hemlock Woolly Adelgid?

The hemlock woolly adelgid, an exotic invasive insect that feeds on eastern and Carolina hemlocks, now occupies about half the range of native hemlock forests in the eastern United States. Once infested, hemlocks lose vigor and die within a 4 to 10 years. Most managers and scientists accept that as time goes on native hemlocks…  More 

Tom Holmes Co-Authors Prize-Winning Article

On August 20, Southern Research Station (SRS) research forester Tom Holmes received notice that a paper he co-authored won the first Soren Wibe Prize from the Journal of Forest Economics. Fellow co-authors of the article are Christopher Moore from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Kathleen Bell from the University of Maine. The Soren Wibe…  More