Protecting Water Quality in North Carolina’s Neuse River Basin

The Neuse River begins in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, and much of its 275-mile journey to the Atlantic Ocean is through forests that are managed for timber. A new study by U.S. Forest Service researchers evaluates Best Management Practices (BMPs) for silviculture operations to see whether water quality in the Neuse River Basin…  More 

Study Finds No Evidence for Widespread Southern Pine Decline

A study by University of Georgia (UGA) and U.S. Forest Service scientists finds that there is no evidence for the widespread occurrence of southern pine decline recently reported as impacting the southern pine region. The results are published online in the journal Forest Ecology and Management. Four southern pine species – loblolly, longleaf, shortleaf, and…  More 

Fusiform Rust Never Sleeps

Fusiform rust, a fungal disease caused by Cronartium quercum f. sp. fusiforme, is the most damaging disease of slash and loblolly pines in the southeastern United States. There are currently over 60.3 million acres of slash and loblolly pine timberland in the Southeast, some of the most productive forests in the world. Forest managers rely…  More 

Eastern White Pine: Estimating Survival and Timber Value

Eastern white pine has grown in the eastern U.S. for millennia, but by the late 1800s, most of the old growth stands had been logged. When forestry in the U.S. emerged during the 1890s, white pine was one of the first species to be replanted, and was one of the main species Gifford Pinchot and…  More 

Where Do U.S. Forest Products Stand Globally?

A newly published report by U.S. Forest Service researchers shows that since the 1990s the U.S. share of the global forest products market has declined as a result of decreases in U.S. construction and paper manufacturing. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) economists Jeff Prestemon and David Wear and SRS staff Michaela Foster authored the general technical…  More 

Mississippi Alluvial Valley Forests: The Next 50 Years

The Southern Forest Futures Project (SFFP) started in 2008 as an effort to study and understand the various forces reshaping the forests across the 13 states of the Southeast. Chartered by the U.S. Forest Service Southern Region and Southern Research Station (SRS) along with the Southern Group of State Foresters, the project examined a variety…  More 

Renewable Energy Policies Drive Production of Southern Wood Pellets for Bioenergy

A recently released study led by U.S. Forest Service scientists and published by the Forest Service’s Southern Research Station (SRS) finds that policies in the European Union (EU) and elsewhere requiring the use of renewable and low greenhouse gas-emitting energy are driving demand for wood pellets used to generate bioenergy. This demand could provide new…  More 

A Future for Freeze-Tolerant Eucalyptus in the South?

Recently published research by U.S. Forest Service scientists provides important first-time analyses of the potential impacts of introducing plantations of freeze-tolerant Eucalyptus into the South. Eucalyptus, a fast-growing tree native to Australia and Indonesia, is planted across large areas of Asia, Africa, and South America as a major source of hardwood fiber for paper and…  More 

Harvesting Southern Pines for Bioenergy: Potential Impacts on Soil

Soils are the foundation of the forested ecosystem, producing timber and clean water while supporting biodiversity and storing carbon. A new study led by U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) scientist D. Andrew Scott examines how harvesting for bioenergy affects soil ecosystem services in loblolly pine plantations. Many southern pine stands are being harvested…  More 

2008 Lacey Act Amendment Successful in Reducing U.S. Imports of Illegally Logged Wood

Recently published research by U.S. Forest Service economist Jeff Prestemon supports the contention that the 2008 Lacey Act Amendment reduced the supply of illegally harvested wood from South America and Asia available for export to the United States. Using monthly import data from 1989 to 2013, Prestemon, project leader of the Forest Service Southern Research…  More