How Tree Diversity Affects Invasive Forest Pests

“Invasive insects and diseases pose both ecological and economic threats to our forest ecosystems,” says Qinfeng Guo, USDA Forest Service research ecologist. Guo is the lead author of a broad-scale study of U.S. forest data that examines the relationship between the number of native tree species and the number of nonnative forest pests. Across their…  More 

The State of the Nation’s Forests

Forests are constantly changing with weather, disturbance, and conversion to other land uses, but how do we know if year-to-year changes are just a one-off or part of a larger shift? Annual summaries of forest health are key to our understanding, say the editors and authors that produced Forest Health Monitoring: National Status, Trends, and…  More 

Emerald Ash Borer and its Enemy Wasps

Since emerald ash borer was first detected in Michigan in 2002, the non-native invasive beetle has killed tens of millions of ash trees across the U.S., and continues to infest new regions. Within its native range in Asia, emerald ash borer is attacked by a variety of predators including several species of parasitoid wasps that…  More 

The Status of Ash Species in Selected Southern States

A new Science Update  from the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) provides the latest data on ash tree (Fraxinus spp.) species in Alabama, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The emerald ash borer, an introduced Asian beetle species first detected in Michigan in 2002, has spread throughout the northeastern U.S. and into the southern states…  More 

Where Does That Infested Firewood Come From?

The spread of damaging invasive forest pests such as the emerald ash borer is only partially powered by the insects’ own wings. People moving firewood for camping can hasten and widen the spread of insects and resulting forest destruction. A new U.S. Forest Service study provides a tool for anticipating the most likely route of human-assisted spread, giving…  More 

Protect Ash Trees: Don’t Move Firewood!

  Emerald ash borer was recently detected in Georgia, making it the 21st state invaded by the non-native pest that attacks all members of the ash genera. First found in Michigan in 2002, the insect has since spread south (and north into Canada), mainly on wood moved long distances. The number one strategy for preventing…  More 

Emerald Ash Borers Invade Southeastern Forests

  The emerald ash borer is one of the most destructive forest pests introduced to North America in recent years. Adult beetles merely nibble on the leaves of native ash trees, but their larvae burrow through the inner bark of the tree, leaving a trail of snaky galleries that permanently scar the tree and make…  More