Selecting Trees to Grow in Cities

Sometimes in the cramped environs of U.S. cities every inch counts, especially if attempting to make space for nature. City planners and urban foresters now have a resource to more precisely select tree species whose growth will be a landscaping dream instead of a maintenance nightmare. The U.S. Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest Research Station recently…  More 

How does intensive forest management affect global carbon storage?

A growing world population demands more wood and fiber, much of which is harvested from intensively managed forests. In these forests, tree growth as well as post-harvest land cover changes can be easy to see, but an invisible part of the management process has captured the attention of scientists and university collaborators with the U.S.…  More 

How Much Carbon is Stored in Mozambique Mangroves?

In an article published online in the journal Forest Ecology and Management, U.S. Forest Service researcher Christina Stringer and collaborators provide the first comprehensive estimate — 14 million megagrams (Mg) or almost 31 trillion pounds — of the carbon sequestered in the mangrove forests of the Zambezi River Delta in Mozambique. More important than the…  More 

Carbon Accumulation by Southeastern Forests May Slow

Carbon accumulation levels in the southeastern U.S. may be slowing due to forest dynamics and land use changes, according to findings of U.S. Forest Service researchers published in the journal Scientific Reports on Friday, January 23. The study authored by Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) scientists John Coulston, David Wear, and Jim Vose, is the…  More 

Taking Termites into Account

  Every homeowner in the Southeast knows about termites and the damage they can do to a house, but most people don’t think about them as forest insects. Termites are saproxylic, meaning they depend on dead or dying wood for at least part of their life cycle, and they play a major role in recycling…  More 

Carbon In, Carbon Out

Look around at all the wood and paper products we consider essential for daily life. Now, consider the carbon stored in those products—carbon that was removed from a forest ecosystem when trees were harvested. This type of carbon storage is quite important: while it’s locked into these products throughout their useful life, this carbon is…  More