Countering Thousand Cankers Disease

In recent decades, thousand cankers disease has become a concern for walnut growers and hardwood forest managers in the United States. A variety of measures have been investigated or developed to counter the disease. A study led by USDA Forest Service research entomologist Albert Mayfield and former University of Tennessee graduate student Jackson Audley looked…  More 

White Pines, Hemlocks, and Sunlight

The Blue Valley Experimental Forest (Blue Valley) lies in southwest North Carolina in the Nantahala National Forest. Located in Macon County, near the point where North Carolina meets Georgia and South Carolina, the experimental forest was established in 1964. At 1,300 acres, it is the smallest of the three experimental forests in North Carolina and the second smallest…  More 

First Release in the Carolinas of New Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Predator

On Friday last week, U.S. Forest Service scientists with the Southern Research Station and Forest Health Protection released just over 1200 Laricobius osakensis beetles on eastern hemlock trees in North and South Carolina. Reared at University of Tennessee Knoxville’s Lindsay Young Beneficial Insects Lab, the predator beetles are natural enemies of the hemlock woolly adelgid, an…  More 

Emerald Ash Borer and its Enemy Wasps

Since emerald ash borer was first detected in Michigan in 2002, the non-native invasive beetle has killed tens of millions of ash trees across the U.S., and continues to infest new regions. Within its native range in Asia, emerald ash borer is attacked by a variety of predators including several species of parasitoid wasps that…  More 

Planting Promise for Hemlocks

On August 3, 15 young volunteers and U.S. Forest Service researchers worked in the hot sun at the Bent Creek Experimental Forest near Asheville, North Carolina, planting eastern hemlock tree seedlings for a biocontrol insectary. Participants from Boy Scout Troop 91 were joined by friends and classmates from area schools and two parents in planting 88…  More 

Bad News for the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Over the past decade, the hemlock woolly adelgid, a tiny insect, has ravaged the hemlocks of Southern Appalachia, causing widespread death of the trees that once lined mountain streams throughout the region. Efforts to keep hemlocks alive include releasing insects that feed on the hemlock woolly adelgid, including the Laricobius beetle featured in a recent…  More