Slowing the Spread of White Nose Syndrome in Bats

Since 2006, a newly discovered fungal disease referred to as white-nose syndrome has killed millions of North American bats. U.S. Forest Service researchers, along with researchers from other Federal and state agencies and universities have been investigating the fungus and its devastating effects on bats since the disease was first noticed. Roger Perry, a research…  More 

Cave Climates and White-Nose Syndrome

  White-nose syndrome, caused by the fungus Geomyces destructans, has decimated bat populations throughout eastern North America. Recent estimates show that 6 to7 million bats have succumbed to white-nose syndrome. This fungus thrives in the cool, moist conditions found in many caves and mines where bats may also hibernate. Roger W. Perry, a research wildlife…  More 

Prestigious USDA Grants Support SRS Research in the Southern Appalachians

In the News Two SRS units—the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory and the Upland Hardwoods Ecology and Management unit—recently received word that their scientists, along with university collaborators, received grants from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI) for studies based in the Southern Appalachian region. AFRI supports research,…  More