Putting Mangrove Data to Work in East Africa

Mangrove forests are among the most carbon-rich ecosystems on the planet. Their stilt-like roots trap carbon and other nutrients that rivers have carried to the coastal deltas where mangroves grow. They act as a buffer, protecting coastlines and the people who live there from increasingly strong seas and storm surges. People depend on mangrove forests…  More 

Mangroves of Mozambique

Whether small and shrubby or tall and majestic, mangroves have an unusual ability – they are specially adapted to grow in brackish water, and can tolerate ocean waves lapping at their stilt-like roots. As stands mature, soil and decaying plant matter becomes captured in the intricate web of their roots. “The soil in mangrove ecosystems…  More 

An Assignment in Africa Connects Forests, Water, and People

Steve McNulty, Ge Sun, and Erika (Cohen) Mack hiked for three hours on a winding trail over steep hills through land thick with trees and vines. They arrived at a pool and looked up at a towering waterfall. If they had stood at the top of the waterfall, they would have seen forested land stretching…  More 

U.S. Forest Service Scientist Helps Establish First Mangrove Experimental Forest in Africa

Mangrove forests stabilize the tropical and subtropical coastlines of most of the world’s continents and provide valuable ecosystem services such as fish habitat and storm buffering. Unfortunately, mangroves are one of the world’s most threatened tropical forest ecosystems, with an estimated 35 percent of the forests already gone worldwide and others being cleared daily for…  More 

Ebola Virus Disease in Liberia

A newly published research study by U.S. Forest Service researchers demonstrates that the social vulnerability indices used in climate change and natural hazards research can also be used in other contexts such as disease outbreaks. Authors of the article include Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) researchers John Stanturf, Scott Goodrick, Mel Warren, and Christie…  More 

How Much Carbon is Stored in Mozambique Mangroves?

In an article published online in the journal Forest Ecology and Management, U.S. Forest Service researcher Christina Stringer and collaborators provide the first comprehensive estimate — 14 million megagrams (Mg) or almost 31 trillion pounds — of the carbon sequestered in the mangrove forests of the Zambezi River Delta in Mozambique. More important than the…  More 

Carbon Pools in African Mangrove Forests

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently announced funding for a proposal that involves the U.S. Forest Service, NASA, Duke University, and the University of Maryland in using field-based research as the basis for developing remote sensing tools to assess and monitor carbon pools in African mangrove forests. The project will use advanced 3-D…  More 

Mangroves in Mozambique

September found U.S. Forest Service researchers Carl Trettin and Christina Stringer camping out on the edge of a mangrove swamp in Africa, watching the ocean tides for the best time to take their skiffs out to search for plots to set up for inventory. They were in Mozambique, which stretches along the eastern coast of Africa…  More 

Developing Countries Tap Future Water Availability

Developing countries often face extreme challenges that negatively affect forests that provide local water supplies. Africa alone has roughly 22 percent forests and woodlands, areas rich with biodiversity, timber, and water resources. However, many of these areas face extreme conditions that threaten unprotected forests and ultimately future water availability. In 2005, Eastern Forest Environmental Threat…  More 

Community Forest Monitoring in Ghana

We celebrate the FAO International Day of Forests with a story from Ghana. U.S. Forest Service scientists are playing a role in restoring and conserving African tropical forest land in Africa by training local communities to monitor their own forests. According to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), deforestation in Africa occurs at roughly twice…  More