People and Plants on the Move

Social Factors and Exotic Plant Invasions in the United States New USDA Forest Service research using improved data from previous studies on exotic plant species in the United States shows that social factors such as human population and time of settlement play a greater part in the spread of exotic species than the natural factors such as…  More 

Keeping Kudzu at Bay

Accidentally introduced insect shows promise in battle with kudzu In October 2009, Dan Suiter, an entomologist with the University of Georgia (UGA), noticed large numbers of an unidentified insect in and around kudzu fields in northeast Georgia. This turned out to be the first recorded sighting of the bean plataspid  aka “kudzu bug“ (Megacopta cribraria) in…  More 

Want to Hunt Down Invasive Plants in Your Forest? There’s an App for That!

SRS Announces New Invasive Plants iPhone App Southern Research Station (SRS) Director Rob Doudrick  recently announced the release of the first version of a new iPhone/iPad app designed to help southern forest land owners and managers identify and manage nonnative invasive plants in the field. This is the first ever iPhone/ipad application developed by the worlds…  More 

Green Builder Partners with SRS Research to Reduce Waste

Most of us know that “building green” means constructing homes that use energy and water resources more efficiently while impacting the environment less.  Probably fewer of us are aware of the significant part recycling wood construction waste can play in reducing environmental impact from home construction.  Across the United States, construction waste from home building…  More 

Cold Water for Trout

Joint research by SRS and the U.S. Geological Survey The names of southern rivers—Roanoke, French Broad, Neuse, Apalachicola, Tar, Tennessee—are nothing if not evocative. As you read them, you may think first of the long human history of the area—or picture the lazy flow of summer water—but the rivers and streams of the southeastern United…  More 

Removing Privet Helps Restore Native Bee Populations

When plants travel the world, they escape the checks and balances of their ancestral ecosystems and can multiply without bounds, competing with native plants for light, nutrients, and water. Do non-native invasive plants also disrupt native bee populations? Jim Hanula, research entomologist with the SRS Insects, Diseases and Invasive Plants unit, explored this question by comparing bee…  More 

Park Access and Environmental Equity

 Forest Service Researcher Looks at Changing Demographics in the South When the term “environmental justice” is used, most people think of the siting of environmental hazards, but environmental justice also includes questions about access to environmental goods. For those who live in towns and cities, access to parks is one such environmental good. Little is…  More 

An Evening Burn to Restore Mountain Forests

The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) and the Southern Research Station(SRS) have been cooperating for over 10 years to study prescribed burning in the Southern Appalachian Mountains on state-owned Green River Game Land in Polk County, NC.  The afternoon and evening of January 31, crews burned study plots on the Green River Game Land…  More 

The Water Web: More about WaSSI

Water quantity and quality issues affect every living thing on Earth, yet, until recently, methods for projecting possible future water supply scenarios were fairly limited. In the late 1990s, Southern Research Station (SRS) scientists participating in several national-scale assessments of climate change science and climate-related impacts discovered “a frustrating lack of landscape-scale, integrated ecosystem models from…  More 

UCS Uses EFETAC Tool to Analyze Power Plant Impacts on Water

Power plants across the United States are contributing to water stress and impacting water quality according to a new report released by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).    To analyze current and future water demand and supplies for the report, Freshwater Use by U.S. Power Plants: Electricitys Thirst for a Precious Resource, UCS researchers used results…  More