Saving the Genetic Treasures of Southern Forests

People have saved seeds since the dawn of agriculture, but scientists at the Southern Research Station (SRS) are doing something new–combining modern genetics and the silvicultural strategy of seed orchards to preserve the genetic heritage of the South’s most at risk- and most ecologically important trees. Trees across the Southeast face exotic pests, shrinking ranges and…  More 

Trees in Transition

In forests as in life, the only constant is change. Forest species are ever adjusting to changing conditions resulting from seasonal fluctuations in temperature and precipitation, disturbances such as storms and wildfire, and interactions with other species. But typical temperature and precipitation patterns are now also changing; in some areas, climatic changes are occurring rather rapidly,…  More 

North Carolina: A Bioenergy Case Study

State and Federal policies on renewable energy will, to a great extent, drive demand for wood-to-energy biomass feedstocks. Across the United States, 29 states and the District of Columbia have adopted renewable portfolio standards (RPS) mandating that a certain percent of the states energy come from renewable sources by a certain date. In the South,…  More 

Unwelcome Pests Often Hitch a Ride

EFETAC and Canadian Researchers Investigate the Firewood Connection Firewood has ignited a national debate, especially in campgrounds, because it can carry unwanted forest insect pests across state borders and potentially even between the United States and Canada. Many of these nonnative pests are well-known—hemlock woolly adelgid, emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle—for causing significant ecological and…  More 

From One Forest to Another

    Some of the most intense ecosystem management in the United States happens behind the secure gates of our military bases.  Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base in North Carolina may not evoke thoughts of scenic streams and woodlands, but managers there are, in many ways, leading the charge for restoring diverse native ecosystems. They’re undertaking…  More 

Southern Pine Beetle Impacts on Forests

Shortleaf pine-hardwood ecosystem restoration following insect outbreak Research by Southern Research Station (SRS) scientists shows that the impacts of recent outbreaks of southern pine beetle further degraded shortleaf pine-hardwood forest ecosystems in the southern Appalachian region. The authors suggest that cutting and burning these sites reduces heavy fuel loads, improves soil nutrient status, and opens…  More 

Creepy Crawlies a Hit at the Kent House Bug Day

There were “good” bugs, “bad” bugs and close to 1,000 people at the 5th Annual Kent House Bug Day sponsored by the Southern Research Station (SRS). The annual event was the idea of former Forest Service student employee Jessica Norris, now a local teacher, and Stacy Blomquist, biological technician with SRS Insects, Diseases, and Invasive Plants unit in Pineville,…  More 

Forestry Webinar Series Wins Two Chiefs’ Award

On May 2, USDA Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell and Natural Resources Conservation Service Chief Dave White announced the 2011 Two Chiefs Partnership Awards, which included a group award for the forestry webinars developed by the Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) and Southern Region (SR), the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Southern Regional Extension…  More 

Refining Fire Behavior Modeling

Assessing Wildland Fuels and Hazard Mitigation Treatments in the Southeast Research by Southern Research Station biometrician Bernie Parresol takes center stage in a special issue of the journal Forest Ecology and Management due out in June in print. Parresol is lead author of two of the five articles—and co-author of two more—in an issue that focuses on…  More 

Upcoming Webinar: Forest Farming with Non-Timber Products

Opportunities to Share Information and Grow Resources Jim Chamberlain, forest products technologist with the Southern Research Station, has carved out a niche in non-timber forest products. Chamberlain focuses on ramps, ginseng, goldenseal, galax, and scores of other non-timber products that flourish in the Appalachian forests. He’s devoted his career to finding and identifying plants, studying…  More