New Tools to Bring Back the American Chestnut

It’s been a long time now since American chestnut trees dominated the forest canopies of the East, so long that there are few people alive who remember stands with trees nearly the size of redwoods or the pungent smell of chestnuts in bloom that filled the forests before the blight came. It’s taken almost 30…  More 

Chestnut Blight

Chestnut blight, the disease that decimated the American chestnut trees of the eastern U.S. in the early 1900s, is mainly caused by Cryphonectria parasitica, a member of the largest group of fungi, the ascomycetes (sac fungi). C. parasitica enters through wounds and cracks in chestnut bark, causing dead areas on bark called cankers. Once introduced, the…  More 

Testing the Survival of American Chestnut Seedlings

The American chestnut tree (Castanea dentata) dominated the forest canopy in the eastern United States for thousands of years, until it was decimated by an exotic fungal pathogen, the chestnut blight (Chryphonectria parasitica) in the early part of the 20th century. Since then, tree enthusiasts and scientists have been trying to find a way to…  More 

SRS-Funded Forest Project Wins National Award

The Western North Carolina Forest Project, funded with a $1.97 million American Reinvestment and Recovery Act grant through the Southern Research Station (SRS), helped retain or create 164 jobs among 15 small businesses and organizations in Western North Carolina. Now the Land-of-Sky Regional Council, the local administrator of the project, has received the 2012 Innovation Award…  More 

North American Freshwater Mussels

New Book Highlights Natural History, Ecology, and Conservation A new book by Southern Research Station (SRS) scientist Wendell Haag provides the first comprehensive view of the ecology and conservation of the approximately 300 species of North American freshwater mussels. Intended for resource managers, scientists, students, and those interested in natural history, North American Freshwater Mussels…  More 

Fragmented Forests

The Southern Forest Resource Assessment published by the Southern Research Station defined forest fragmentation as the breaking up of large, contiguous (touching one another) forested tracts into smaller or less contiguous tracts. This means that forests become islands or peninsulas — patches of woods disconnected from one another by roads, farms, suburbs, cities, and other…  More 

Hse Receives Distinguished Service Award

On August 27, 2012, Southern Research Station (SRS) scientist Dr. Chung-Yun Hse received the Distinguished Service Award, the highest honor bestowed by the Society of Wood Science and Technology (SWST). The award was presented during the SWST annual convention in Beijing, China. Hse received the award “in recognition of his dedication and distinguished service to…  More 

Interior Forest on the Wane in the United States

Interior forest, which can be simply defined as forest area surrounded by more forest, supports a wide range of plants and animals that do not thrive in forest edges or the small patches of woods left by human activities. Many of the nations most important rivers originate in interior forest, which also shelters municipal watersheds and…  More 

Southern Research Station Director’s Awards Announced

The 2012 Southern Research Station (SRS) Director’s Awards were announced September 19, and will be awarded on October 30 at the SRS Leadership Team meeting in Raleigh, NC. The ceremony will be held at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences Nature Research Center.    Distinguished Science Award Steve McNulty, Raleigh, NC–For distinguished scientific leadership and contributions on…  More 

Southern Research Station Adds Two New Flux Monitoring Towers

Southern Research Station (SRS) scientists recently added two new eddy covariance towers to the Ameriflux network, setting the instruments up at the Coweeta Hydrologic Station in Otto, North Carolina, and the Crossett Experimental Forest in southern Arkansas. Established in 1996 and currently made up of sites throughout the Western Hemisphere, the Ameriflux network provides continuous…  More