Interagency ForWarn Team Recognized for Federal Collaboration

The U.S. Forest Service Eastern and Western Threat Centers’ ForWarn team is among the agency recipients of the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer (FLC) Southeast Region’s 2012 Partnership Award. The award recognizes the collaborative efforts of team members from the Forest Service, NASA Stennis Space Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and US Geological Survey…  More 

Managing For Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

The nonnative invasive insect hemlock woolly adelgid is taking its toll on eastern hemlock trees in the Southern Appalachian region of the United States, where the tree often serves as a foundation or keystone species along mountain streams. A new article by U.S. Forest Service researchers covers the latest in control strategies for hemlock woolly…  More 

Carbon In, Carbon Out

Look around at all the wood and paper products we consider essential for daily life. Now, consider the carbon stored in those products—carbon that was removed from a forest ecosystem when trees were harvested. This type of carbon storage is quite important: while it’s locked into these products throughout their useful life, this carbon is…  More 

Longleaf Pine Forests in the South, Past and Future

A new report from the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) describes the history and current condition of longleaf pine in the southern United States. Co-authored by researchers from the SRS Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) and Longleaf Pine Ecosystems units, findings from the report provide a solid baseline of information that land and…  More 

Long-term Data Reveals Changing Climate Trends

Long-term data from a U.S. Forest Service experimental forest reveals that air temperatures have risen significantly since the late 1970s, while droughts are becoming more severe and frequent, and precipitation more intense and variable. The findings were recently published in the journal Hydrology Research. For almost 80 years, the main climate station at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory (Coweeta),…  More 

Tax Tips for Forest Landowners for 2012

Every fall, Linda Wang, national timber tax specialist, and John Greene, research forester for the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS), prepare tax tips specifically for forest landowners. These tips are published as a Technology Update by Forest Service Southern Region. Federal income tax law contains provisions to encourage stewardship and management of private…  More 

Bio-prospecting in Beetles

Forest Service Grant Supports Undergraduate Research Funding from the U.S. Forest Service certainly served its purpose of enhancing undergraduate research at Delta State University (DSU) in Cleveland, Mississippi. Almost 3 years ago, Tanya McKinney and Ellen Green, associate professors of biology at DSU, started brainstorming a project to give science undergraduates research experience in the fields…  More 

ForWarn Team Wins 2013 Interagency Partnership Award

  The U.S. Forest Service Eastern Forest and Western Wildland Environmental Threat Assessment Centers‘ ForWarn team is among the agency recipients of the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer’s (FLC) 2013 Interagency Partnership Award. The award recognizes the collaborative efforts of federal laboratory employees for outstanding work in technology transfer, and is one of the…  More 

SRS Scientists Contribute to New National Report

Study projects significant forest loss due to suburbanization and land fragmentation A comprehensive U.S. Forest Service report released on December 18 examines the ways expanding populations, increased urbanization, and changing land-use patterns could profoundly impact natural resources, including water supplies, nationwide during the next 50 years.  Forest Service Southern Research Station scientists who took lead roles in conducting…  More 

Invasive Earthworms, No Joke

Earthworms, the darlings of gardeners, fishers and composters, have a dark side: some are globetrotters and when introduced to new homes can cause real problems, both above and below ground. “Invasive earthworms are a global problem and can cause considerable changes to ecosystems,” says Mac Callaham, research ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research…  More