Rising Temperatures Permit Expansion of Southern Pine Beetle Into New Jersey

The New York Times recently ran a front page story about the damaging spread of southern pine beetle through the New Jersey Pinelands. The article included an interview with Dartmouth biologist Matt Ayres, who talked about how rising temperatures allowed the insect pest to thrive in an area where cold winters once killed it. Ayres’…  More 

Forest Service Launches GeoTreesearch

U.S. Forest Service research is now just a click away, with a new web-based application called GeoTreesearch that allows users to search tens of thousands of publications by topic and geography. Research has been part of the Forest Service mission since the agency’s inception in 1905. Today, some 500-plus Forest Service researchers work in a…  More 

Loss of Eastern Hemlock Will Affect Forest Water Use

Eastern hemlock grows in streamside areas throughout the southern Appalachian Mountains, where it is a keystone species. Because of its dense evergreen foliage, constant year-round transpiration (loss of water from needles) rate,  and dominance in riparian and cove habitats,  eastern hemlock plays an important role in the area’s water cycle, and regulates stream flow year…  More 

Managing For Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

The nonnative invasive insect hemlock woolly adelgid is taking its toll on eastern hemlock trees in the Southern Appalachian region of the United States, where the tree often serves as a foundation or keystone species along mountain streams. A new article by U.S. Forest Service researchers covers the latest in control strategies for hemlock woolly…  More 

Annual Bugfest Features “Bad Bugs in the Forest”

Where did more than 35,000 moms, dads, children, and their friends go for fun-filled, “buggy” entertainment, activities, and cuisine this year? They all showed up early and stayed late for the 16th annual Bugfest hosted by the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh, NC. The Southern Research Station (SRS) was a co-sponsor of this years…  More 

What Comes After Hemlock Woolly Adelgid?

The hemlock woolly adelgid, an exotic invasive insect that feeds on eastern and Carolina hemlocks, now occupies about half the range of native hemlock forests in the eastern United States. Once infested, hemlocks lose vigor and die within a 4 to 10 years. Most managers and scientists accept that as time goes on native hemlocks…  More 

Nosing Out Future Landslides

In the mountains of Southern Appalachia, landslides sometimes follow major rainstorms. Increases in the frequency of heavy rainfall events predicted under climate change could ramp up the risk of landslides in an area where development and roads crawl up steep hillsides. In western North Carolina, the North Carolina Geological Survey  documented over 2,700 landslides and…  More 

Saving the Genetic Treasures of Southern Forests

People have saved seeds since the dawn of agriculture, but scientists at the Southern Research Station (SRS) are doing something new–combining modern genetics and the silvicultural strategy of seed orchards to preserve the genetic heritage of the South’s most at risk- and most ecologically important trees. Trees across the Southeast face exotic pests, shrinking ranges and…  More 

Unwelcome Pests Often Hitch a Ride

EFETAC and Canadian Researchers Investigate the Firewood Connection Firewood has ignited a national debate, especially in campgrounds, because it can carry unwanted forest insect pests across state borders and potentially even between the United States and Canada. Many of these nonnative pests are well-known—hemlock woolly adelgid, emerald ash borer, Asian longhorned beetle—for causing significant ecological and…  More 

Tennessees Urban Forests Valued in the Billions

Tennessees urban forests, currently valued at about $80 billion, also provide almost $650 million in benefits such as carbon storage, pollution removal, and energy reduction. These values come from Urban Forests of Tennessee, 2009, a newly released report published by the Southern Research Station (SRS). “This represents the first statewide inventory and forest health monitoring…  More