In Arkansas, Fall Tree Roosts Help Male Indiana Bats Survive Hibernation

“Two resources are most important to bats in the eastern U.S.,” says U.S. Forest Service biologist Roger Perry. “Roosts – places they can safely spend daylight hours – and insects for food.” Because roosts also allow bats to sink into torpor, a state of lowered metabolism and energy usage, roosts may be as important for…  More 

An Early Warning System for Bats in North America

This week the U.S. Forest Service is participating in the celebration of Bat Week, an international effort to bring attention to the role of bats in nature and the threats they face across the world. Bats play essential roles in the health of both the environment and the economy, pollinating plants, dispersing seeds – and…  More 

U.S. Forest Service Publishes Plan for North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat)

Just published online by the Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS), A Plan for the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) provides detailed guidelines for participating in NABat, an international multiagency program created to provide the data needed to make effective decisions about bat populations across the North American continent. Susan Loeb, SRS research ecologist,…  More 

International Bat Monitoring Research Group Receives “Wings Across the Americas” Award

On March 9th, U.S. Forest Service scientist Susan Loeb and numerous partners were recognized with the Forest Service Wings Across the Americas Research Award for their contributions to the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat). Wings Across the Americas is an international Forest Service program that works with a wide range of partners in the…  More 

Little Brown Bats of Alaska

Bats do live in southcentral Alaska, that much is known. But the list of unknowns is longer.  Which species live there? What habitats do they prefer? Where do they roost? What are their foraging habits? A recent U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) study begins to fill the information void about Alaskan bats. SRS scientist Susan Loeb,…  More 

Workshop April 30 – May 1: Fire Management and Quality of Bat Habitat

  Register now: “Relationships between Fire Management and the Quality of Habitat for Bats: A Workshop for Scientists and Land Managers”   Prescribed fires in mixed-oak forests are thought to improve bat foraging habitat, outweighing the risks from smoke and heat exposure during fires. However, relatively few studies about the relationships between fire and habitat…  More 

Climate Change Projected to Alter Indiana Bat Maternity Range

Research by U.S. Forest Service scientists forecasts profound changes over the next 50 years in the summer range of the endangered Indiana bat, one of many eastern bat species whose numbers are already decreasing due to white-nose syndrome and other factors. In an article published in the journal Ecology and Evolution, Forest Service Southern Research…  More