The Bottomland Forests of the East Coast’s Albemarle Sound

The Albemarle Sound watershed stretches 6 million acres along the North Carolina and Virginia borders. “The Sound contains some of the largest areas of bottomland hardwood habitat in the eastern United States,” says U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) research ecologist Anita Rose. “In a variety of ways, both nature and people depend on…  More 

Acorns: The Forest’s Bread and Butter

  Acorns are often referred to as “a keystone species of the forest” because of the critical role they play in ecosystem dynamics. Rodents feed heavily on acorns and, in turn, predators such as foxes and hawks prey on rodent populations plump from acorn feasting. Deer and black bears depend on acorns too. In fact,…  More 

Oaks in the Red

U.S. Forest Service and university researchers are working together to understand the escalating decline and death of oaks—especially red oaks—in the Ozark Highlands of Arkansas and Missouri. Research forest ecologist Marty Spetich from the Forest Service Southern Research Station and scientists from the Forest Service Northern Research Station (NRS), Mississippi State University, and the University of Missouri team…  More 

Impact of Red Oak Borer Outbreaks on Arkansas Forests

Over the past 50 years, oak decline events have been reported in upland oak forests of the eastern United States with increasing frequency — and Arkansas is no exception. A team of forest entomologists at the University of Arkansas led by Fred Stephen, in cooperation with Jim Guldin, project leader of the Southern Research Station (SRS)…  More