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Compass Issue 9
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Compass is a quarterly publication of the USDA Forest Service's Southern Research Station (SRS). As part of the Nation's largest forestry research organization -- USDA Forest Service Research and Development -- SRS serves 13 Southern States and beyond. The Station's 130 scienists work in more than 20 units located across the region at Federal laboratories, universites, and experimental forests.



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Issue 9

Recommended Reading

Altered Light

Loftis, D.L. 1990. A shelterwood method for regenerating red oak in the Southern Appalachians. Forest Science. 36(4): 917-929.

Loftis, D.L. 2004. Upland oak regeneration and management. In: Spetich, M.A. Upland oak ecology symposium: history, current conditions, and sustainability. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–73. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 163-167.

Loftis, D.L.; McGee, C.E., eds. 1993. Oak regeneration: serious problems practical recommendations. Gen. Tech. Rep. SE–84. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment Station. 319 p.

Forest Openings Grow More Fruit

Greenberg, C.H.; Levey, D.J.; Loftis, D.L. 2007. Fruit production in mature and recently regenerated forests of the Appalachians. Journal of Wildlife Management. 71(2): 321-335.

A Burning Question

Campbell, J.W.; Hanula, J.L.; Waldrop, T.A. 2007. Effects of prescribed fire and fire surrogates on floral visiting insects of the Blue Ridge Province in North Carolina. Southeastern Naturalist. 6(1): 179-182.

Hamel, P.B.; Buckner, E.R. 1998. How far could a squirrel travel in the treetops? A prehistory of the southern forest. In: Wadsworth, K.G., ed. Transactions of the sixty-third North American wildlife and natural resources conferences. Washington, DC: Wildlife Management Institute: 309-315.

Vose, J.M. 2000. Perspectives on using prescribed fire to achieve desired ecosystem conditions. In: Moser, W.K.; Moser, C.F., eds. Proceedings, 15th annual Tall Timbers fire ecology conference. Tallahassee, FL: Tall Timbers Research Station. 15: 12-17.

The Forest For the Trees

Schweitzer, C.J. 2004. First-year response on an upland hardwood forest to five levels of overstory tree retention. In: Connor, K.F., ed. Proceedings of the 12th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 287-291.

Schweitzer, C.J.; Gardiner, E.S.; Loftis, D.L. 2006. Response of sungrown and shade-grown northern red oak seedlings to outplanting in clearcuts and shelterwoods in northern Alabama. In: Connor, K.F., ed. Proceedings of the 13th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–92. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 269-274.

Schweitzer, C.J.; Loftis, D.L.; Wang, Y.; Janzen, G.C. 2004. Regeneration potential of selected forested stands on the Cumberland Plateau of north Alabama. In: Spetich, M.A. Upland oak ecology symposium: history, current conditions, and sustainability. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS–73. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station: 269-274.

It's All Good

Hamel, P.B. 2006. Adaptive forest management to improve habitats for cerulean warbler. In: Proceedings of Society of American Foresters National Convention 2006: 1-25.

Hamel, P.B.; Dawson, D.K.; Keyser, P.D. 2004. How can we learn more about the cerulean warbler (Dendroica cerulea)? The Auk. 121(1): 7-14.

Robbins, C.S.; Fitzpatrick, J.W.; Hamel, P.B. 1992. A warbler in trouble: Dendroica cerulea. In: Hagan, J.M.; Johnston, D.W., eds. Ecology and management of neotropical migrant landbirds. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press: 549-562.

Southern Bats Like Hardwoods

Ford, W.M.; Menzel, J.M.; Menzel, M.A. [and others]. 2006. Presence and absence of bats across habitat scales in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Journal of Wildlife Management. 70(5): 1200-1209.

Loeb, S.C.; O'Keefe, J.M. 2006. Habitat use by forest bats in South Carolina in relation to local, stand, and landscape characteristics. Journal of Wildlife Management. 70(5): 1210-1218.

Menzel, J.M.; Menzel, M.A.; Kilgo, J.C. [and others]. 2005. Effect of habitat and foraging height on bat activity in the Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Journal of Wildlife Management. 69(1): 235-245.

Of Fire Scars and Arkansas Oaks

Guyette, R.P.; Spetich, M.A.; Stambaugh, M.C. 2006. Historic fire regime dynamics and forcing factors in the Boston Mountains, Arkansas, USA. Forest Ecology and Management. 234: 293-304.

Soucy, R.D.; Heitzman, E.; Spetich, M.A. 2005. The establishment and development of oak forests in the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 35: 1790-1797.

Spetich, M. 2004. Upland oak ecology symposium: history, current conditions, and sustainability. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-73. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 311 p.

The Gypsy Moth

Invasion Gottschalk, K. 1993. Silvicultural guidelines for forest stands threatened by the gypsy moth. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE-171. Radnor, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 50+p.

Kauffman, B.W.; Clatterbuck, W. [Date unknown]. Forest management strategies to minimize the impact of gypsy moth. SP678. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Extension. 8 p.

Liebhold, A.M.; Gottschalk, K.W.; Muzika, R.-M. [and others]. 1995. Suitability of North American tree species to gypsy moth: a summary of field and laboratory tests. Gen. Tech. Rep. NE–211. Radnor, PA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station. 34 p.

Sudden Oak Death

Oak, S.W.; Smith, W.D.; Tkacz, B.M. 2006. Phyophthora ramorum detection surveys for forests in the United States. In: Brasier, C.; Jung, T.; Oswald, W., eds. Progress in research on Phytophthera diseases of forest trees. Farnham, Surrey, UK: Forest Research: 28-30.

 

 






Fleshy fruits such as blackberries are a key food resource for wildlife. (Photo by Chris Evans, River to River CWMA, www.bugwood.org)