Temperature Drives Invasive Asian Earthworm’s Hatching Success

Amynthas agrestis is an Asian earthworm that has become increasingly abundant in North American forests. The earthworms consume massive quantities of leaf litter, disrupt established food webs, and outcompete native species. Ideas for control have been limited by the lack of information on their life history traits, such as optimal hatching temperature. With UGA graduate…  More 

Introducing Science Shorts

SRS is adding a new feature to CompassLive: Science Shorts. Science Shorts are 200-word summaries, similar to a news brief, that highlight one or two key findings from a new research paper. They were inspired by The Wildlife Professional’s Science in Short columns. SRS Science Shorts will not replace the longer CompassLive articles, but their…  More 

Modeling Study on Cattle Feed Crops & River Flow Depletion

A new study uses a USDA Forest Service modeling tool – the Water Supply Stress Index, or WaSSI, ecosystem services model – to explore the relationship between water use, river flows, and fish populations across the conterminous U.S. Brian Richter from the University of Virginia led the study. SRS researcher Peter Caldwell’s expertise with WaSSI…  More 

Targeted Deer Removal Can Reduce Deer-Vehicle Collisions

Deer-vehicle collisions are common, dangerous, and costly examples of human-wildlife conflict in the U.S. Targeted removal (sharpshooting) of deer that linger on the side of the road has proven effective in reducing such conflict in urban areas. USDA Forest Service research wildlife biologist John Kilgo, along with collaborators, tested this strategy in a secure, wooded…  More 

Reptile and Amphibian Response to Prescribed Burns in Florida

USDA Forest Service and University of Florida scientists partnered to monitor reptiles and amphibians before and after growing season (spring and summer) and dormant season (winter) prescribed burns in longleaf pine sandhills in a study on the Ocala National Forest in Florida. The research team recorded the number of animals captured, the number of species…  More