Cogongrass Can Be Stopped

Over the past decade, U.S. Forest Service researchers have been working with university cooperators to find some way to slow down or stop the relentless spread of cogongrass. In late 2014, Auburn University researchers reported results that demonstrated, for the first time, that patches of cogongrass can be eliminated completely within three years — showing…  More 

The Chipola Experimental Forest

Located in the sandhills of the Florida Panhandle, the Chipola Experimental Forest (Chipola) was established in 1952 on privately owned land under a 99-year lease to the Southern Forest Experiment Station (now the Southern Research Station), International Paper Company, and Hardaway Contracting Company. The two companies requested the cooperative arrangement with the Forest Service to…  More 

Regenerating Shortleaf Pine in the Southern Appalachians

On June 14th, at the annual meeting of the Southern Group of State Foresters, Arkansas State Forester Joe Fox and U.S. Forest Service Southern Region Deputy Regional Forester Ken Arney announced the release of a long-awaited five-year plan developed by the Shortleaf Pine Initiative to stem the rapid decline of regional short­leaf pine forests. Shortleaf…  More 

It’s Complicated: The Relationship between Climate and Seed Production in Longleaf Pine

The longleaf pine tree is a finicky and slow seed producer, and scientists have long suspected that fluctuations in seed production are related to climate. U.S. Forest Service research ecologist Qinfeng Guo and colleagues recently found evidence of a complicated relationship between seed production and climate. A long-term dataset that spans 10 sites and six states…  More 

Guidelines for Producing Quality Longleaf Pine Seeds

High-quality longleaf pine seeds are essential for producing nursery seedlings that perform well in the field, but producing them is not as easy as it might seem. Longleaf pine seeds are unusually sensitive to damage during collection, processing, treatment and storage. In 2002, Jim Barnett, then project leader for the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research…  More 

Longleaf Pine Cone Prospects for 2016 and 2017

Dale Brockway, research ecologist for the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS), recently published his annual summary of projected longleaf pine cone production for 2016 and 2017. The report shows an overall failure of the crop for 2016, and a fair outlook for 2017. “Our estimates show the 2016 crop averaging only 3.4 cones…  More 

Water Planning for the South in the New Fire Age

The ability to provide fresh drinking water is a critical ecosystem service of forests, and for many households in the southeastern United States, forests are the only source of municipal water supply. About 32 percent of the Southeast’s total annual water supply originates on state and private forest lands and another 3.4 percent on National Forest System…  More 

2016 Southern Pine Silviculture Training Held in Arkansas and Louisiana

For 10 straights days from 25 April through May 3, U.S. Forest Service personnel from the Southern Research Station, Region 8, and State and Private Forestry (S&PF) taught a short course on southern pine silviculture as part of the National Advanced Silviculture Program (NASP). The silviculture certification program for the Forest Service, NASP consists of…  More 

Fires, Fuels, and Longleaf Pine in the Western Gulf Region

On April 6, 2016, scientists from the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) presented findings on prescribed fire, longleaf pine, and other topics during an all-day workshop titled “Louisiana Fire, Fuels, and Longleaf Pine Management: Lessons from the Kisatchie National Forest and the Palustris Experimental Forest.” Mary Anne S. Sayer, SRS research plant physiologist…  More 

The Complexities of Longleaf Pine Cone Production

“Longleaf pine forests are among the most important ecosystems in the southeastern United States,” says U.S. Forest Service research ecologist Qinfeng Guo. “However, they have declined dramatically since European settlement and are considered endangered.” Longleaf pine ecosystems once covered an estimated 80 to 90 million acres across the southeastern U.S. – from Virginia to Texas – but…  More