Educating Future Engineers about Cities and Trees

According to the 2010 census, almost 81 percent of the U.S. population lives in urban areas. As the U.S. loses more of its forests and natural resources to the expansion of urban areas, it is important to provide information about the benefits of trees, forests, and natural areas to city planners and the engineers who…  More 

Austin’s Urban Forest

In late February, the U.S. Forest Service published its first urban forest assessment for Austin, Texas. Using Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data, Austin’s Urban Forest 2014 provides details on the composition and health of the city’s urban forest and the benefits it provides. According to the report, Austin’s trees provide almost $34…  More 

How the Urban Forest Strike Teams Began

The Urban Forest Strike Teams (UFSTs) are a means for city foresters, state foresters, commercial arborists, and others to quickly come to the aid of a region whose urban forest has been impacted by a natural disaster. Here’s the backstory.  In 2003, Hurricane Isabel cut a devastating path across Virginia, leaving lots of damaged trees…  More 

Dealing With Trees Damaged by Hurricanes

Hurricanes bring winds that can exceed 125 miles per hour, heavy rain, and flooding — any or all of which can damage trees. Although some damage can be seen immediately, some effects of structural damage to trees may not become apparent for years after a hurricane. On the other hand, what may initially seem like…  More 

Linking Water, Forests, & Communities in Atlanta: Part 3

Proctor Creek snakes through downtown Atlanta and eventually works its way north to the Chattahoochee River. In 2013, Proctor Creek was named one of 11 new projects of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership, an innovative union of 13 federal agencies that focus on both natural resources and economic development. As a part of the partnership,…  More 

Linking Water, Forests, & Communities in Atlanta: Part 2

Projects led by Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) researchers support a wide partnership effort to clean up an urban Atlanta river and revitalize the communities in its watershed. Proctor Creek snakes through downtown Atlanta and eventually works its way north to the Chattahoochee River. Along the way it passes through both middle and lower…  More 

Linking Water, Forests, & People in Atlanta: Part 1, Urban Forest Assessment

Projects led by Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) researchers support a wide partnership to clean up an urban Atlanta river and revitalize the communities in its watershed. Proctor Creek snakes through downtown Atlanta and eventually works its way north to the Chattahoochee River. Along the way it passes through both middle and lower income…  More 

Urban Forestry South Tests New Urban Forest Sustainability and Management Audit System

An audit system developed by the U.S. Forest Service can help urban forest programs benchmark their resources and program capacity, and provide direction for urban forest management programs and plans. Urban Forestry South, a science delivery center of the Forest Service Southern Research Station Integrating Human and Natural Systems unit, recently beta tested their new…  More 

Health Benefits of Green Spaces Not Shared Equally

Without forests, parks, gardens, and other green spaces, some people may be at a higher risk of health challenges such as heart disease, obesity, depression, and heat-related illness. “Decades of research suggest that the natural environment can play an important role in sustaining public health,” says U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) scientist Viniece…  More 

What Trees Offer City Dwellers

  Urban parks and forests may well be the only “nature” that many Americans experience, and the first contact that many children have with the great outdoors. Forming that connection in the urban forest may be a first step towards a hike in a national forest. And there many more benefits from urban trees than…  More