Cytogenetics and the Fate of Trees

  Nurul Islam-Faridi, research geneticist with the Southern Research Station (SRS) Forest Tree Molecular Cytogenetics Laboratory on the Texas A&M campus at College Station, TX, and adjunct professor in the university’s Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, is one of a handful of scientists in the world who can literally count the chromosomes inside the living cells of any…  More 

Ozone Effects on Forest Watersheds in the Southeast

  Southern Research Station (SRS) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) scientists have found that rising levels of ozone, a greenhouse gas, may amplify the impacts of higher temperatures and reduce streamflow from forests to rivers, streams, and other water bodies. Such effects could potentially reduce water supplies available to support forest ecosystems and people…  More 

Testing the Survival of American Chestnut Seedlings

The American chestnut tree (Castanea dentata) dominated the forest canopy in the eastern United States for thousands of years, until it was decimated by an exotic fungal pathogen, the chestnut blight (Chryphonectria parasitica) in the early part of the 20th century. Since then, tree enthusiasts and scientists have been trying to find a way to…  More 

Fragmented Forests

The Southern Forest Resource Assessment published by the Southern Research Station defined forest fragmentation as the breaking up of large, contiguous (touching one another) forested tracts into smaller or less contiguous tracts. This means that forests become islands or peninsulas — patches of woods disconnected from one another by roads, farms, suburbs, cities, and other…  More 

Interior Forest on the Wane in the United States

Interior forest, which can be simply defined as forest area surrounded by more forest, supports a wide range of plants and animals that do not thrive in forest edges or the small patches of woods left by human activities. Many of the nations most important rivers originate in interior forest, which also shelters municipal watersheds and…  More 

More Fuel for Fire?

Fire has been a fact of life for millennia in the South, shaping the range and ecology of pine, certain oak, and palm forests. But along with shrinking polar ice and rising sea levels, there’s general agreement among climate scientists that climate change will probably increase both the intensity and frequency of fire in the southern…  More 

What Comes After Hemlock Woolly Adelgid?

The hemlock woolly adelgid, an exotic invasive insect that feeds on eastern and Carolina hemlocks, now occupies about half the range of native hemlock forests in the eastern United States. Once infested, hemlocks lose vigor and die within a 4 to 10 years. Most managers and scientists accept that as time goes on native hemlocks…  More 

CRAFTING Future Forests

Over the past few years, Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center (EFETAC) scientists have developed and refined a new resource, the Comparative Risk Assessment Framework and Tools (CRAFT), designed to help natural resource managers and stakeholders work through land management decisions and find common ground, sometimes by coming up with unexpected solutions. EFETAC launched CRAFT as…  More 

Secretary’s Honor Award for Southern Pine Beetle Prevention Program

On September 12, the team leading the Forest Health Protection Southern Pine Beetle Prevention Program received a 2012 USDA Secretary’s Honor Award. Key members of the group are John Nowak (team leader), Don Duerr, Wes Nettleton, and Linda Brett from Forest Service, Region 8, and Kier Klepzig, Assistant Director for Research at the Southern Research Station. …  More 

New Guide to Woodwasps of the Western Hemisphere

Includes DNA barcodes for early detection of major pests The North American forest community reacted with alarm when specimens of Sirex noctilio Fabricius were found in New York State in 2004.  Native to Europe, Asia and northern Africa, S. noctilio—a species of woodwasp in the family Siricidae—is fairly benign in its native range, but as a…  More