From the Hexacopter: A Bird’s Eye View on Fire

What would you find out if you could hover a hundred feet above a prescribed fire? As you might have noticed, smoke from burning trees rises quickly, especially if there’s wind. Getting measurements of smoke once it gets above the canopy is very difficult, and up to now, very expensive. Scientists from the U.S. Forest…  More 

Water Management : A Balancing Act

It may come as little surprise that human activities and climate influence the volume of water in rivers, but U.S. Forest Service research is now revealing just how much. Scientists with the Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center are examining the individual and combined effects of changing land cover, human water use, and climate through…  More 

Forest Service Associate Chief Mary Wagner Tours Key Research Projects

U.S Forest Service Associate Chief Mary Wagner  recently toured several Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) experimental forests and collaborative projects in North Carolina.  While in Asheville, North Carolina, Associate Chief Wagner visited the Bent Creek Experimental Forest, headquarters for the SRS Upland Hardwood Ecology and Management unit.  The tour highlighted collaborative studies with the…  More 

How to Grow American Chestnut

American chestnut thrived in eastern North American forests for thousands of years, but in the 20th century, an exotic fungus almost eliminated the species. To date, chestnut restoration has mostly meant breeding blight-resistant trees. Now, thanks to a collaboration between the U.S. Forest Service, The American Chestnut Foundation, and institutions like the University of Tennessee…  More 

Eastern Threat Center Co-Organizes Special Landscape Ecology Event

The term “landscape ecology” may have different meanings for different people. That’s because the science of landscape ecology encompasses many subjects, perspectives, interactions, and scales. “It is about people, ecosystems, species, energy, pollutants, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and remote sensing, modeling, disturbance, flows, conservation, and many, many other things,” according to the US-Regional Association of…  More 

Oaks in the Red

U.S. Forest Service and university researchers are working together to understand the escalating decline and death of oaks—especially red oaks—in the Ozark Highlands of Arkansas and Missouri. Research forest ecologist Marty Spetich from the Forest Service Southern Research Station and scientists from the Forest Service Northern Research Station (NRS), Mississippi State University, and the University of Missouri team…  More 

Cave Climates and White-Nose Syndrome

  White-nose syndrome, caused by the fungus Geomyces destructans, has decimated bat populations throughout eastern North America. Recent estimates show that 6 to7 million bats have succumbed to white-nose syndrome. This fungus thrives in the cool, moist conditions found in many caves and mines where bats may also hibernate. Roger W. Perry, a research wildlife…  More 

New Books on Forest Landscape Restoration

Two new books link natural and social sciences U.S. Forest Service scientists made significant contributions to two related books recently published by Springer:  Forest Landscape Restoration: Integrating Natural and Social Sciences and A Goal-Oriented Approach to Forest landscape Restoration. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) scientist John Stanturf served as lead editor on both books,…  More 

Emerald Ash Borers Invade Southeastern Forests

  The emerald ash borer is one of the most destructive forest pests introduced to North America in recent years. Adult beetles merely nibble on the leaves of native ash trees, but their larvae burrow through the inner bark of the tree, leaving a trail of snaky galleries that permanently scar the tree and make…  More 

McNulty Named “Most Distinguished” in Forest Science

  Dr. Steven McNulty, research ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS), recently received the agency’s national “Research and Development Distinguished Science Award.” He is recognized for sustained research productivity, proactive science technology, innovative leadership, applied forest science, and longtime federal service. McNulty will accept his award during the February 12, 2013,…  More