Employment and Income Trends for Forest-Based Sectors in the South

The Southern Forest Futures Project (SFFP) started in 2008 as an effort to study and understand the various forces reshaping the forests across the 13 states of the Southeast. Chartered by the U.S. Forest Service Southern Region and Southern Research Station, along with the Southern Group of State Foresters, the project examines a variety of…  More 

Reflections on the Southern Forest Futures Project

In 2008, we started the Southern Forest Futures Project with 15 public workshops held in each of the 13 States of our region. In Baton Rouge, Asheville, Stillwater, Charleston, and all the other locations, we discussed and compiled the concerns of more than 700 resource professionals and other interested  citizens regarding the great and vast…  More 

Forest Service Associate Chief Mary Wagner Tours Key Research Projects

U.S Forest Service Associate Chief Mary Wagner  recently toured several Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) experimental forests and collaborative projects in North Carolina.  While in Asheville, North Carolina, Associate Chief Wagner visited the Bent Creek Experimental Forest, headquarters for the SRS Upland Hardwood Ecology and Management unit.  The tour highlighted collaborative studies with the…  More 

American’s Preferences for Outdoor Recreation Changing

The Southern Research Station (SRS) recently published a national study, Outdoor Recreation Trends and Futures, which shows that American’s current choices for outdoor recreation differ noticeably from those made by previous generations. Participation in “traditional” activities such as hunting and fishing has flattened or declined, while participation in activities that involve viewing and photographing nature is growing.…  More 

What are Americans Doing for Recreation?

The National Survey on Recreation and the Environment The National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE) is the latest of eight national telephone surveys focusing on public outdoor recreation and environmental attitudes. Started in 1960, when the U.S. Congress created the Outdoor Recreation Resources Review Commission, the first National Recreation Survey (NRS) was a…  More 

Are Kids in the Woods?

  Results from the National Kids Survey There have been very few scientific studies on the outdoor activities of children and youth. The few that have been published are relatively small, surveying less than 500 individuals. In 2007, to address an important gap in information about kids and the outdoors, Ken Cordell, pioneering research scientist,…  More 

Park Access and Environmental Equity

 Forest Service Researcher Looks at Changing Demographics in the South When the term “environmental justice” is used, most people think of the siting of environmental hazards, but environmental justice also includes questions about access to environmental goods. For those who live in towns and cities, access to parks is one such environmental good. Little is…  More 

How Many People Hike the AT Every Year?

The Appalachian National Scenic Trail (AT) stretches 2,175 miles from Mount Katahdin in Maine to Springer Mountain in Georgia. Each spring, thousands of people set out to hike the entire trail, and innumerable others hike sections of it throughout the year. Just how to measure the number of people who hike the AT is the subject of a…  More