FIA Stakeholders Meeting

Across the nation, USDA Forest Inventory and Analysis collects data on forest ecosystems, including soils, microbes, land ownership, carbon, invasive plants, and of course, trees. Every two years, experts from the U.S. and beyond gather to share their knowledge. The 2019 FIA Stakeholders Science Meeting was held in Knoxville, Tennessee from November 19-21. The National…  More 

FIA Data Inform Studies on Land Use Conversions, Markets, and More

Strong forest markets protect forests by reducing conversion of forests to other land uses, according to a recent study. The study uses data from the Forest Inventory and Analysis program. “Across the Southeast and the rest of the U.S., FIA provides detailed observations of every aspect of the forest resource,” says John Coulston, a USDA…  More 

Assessing the Health of U.S. Forests

Forests are complex ecosystems. They are constantly changing as a result of tree growth, variations in weather and climate, and disturbances from fire, pathogens, and other stressors. The USDA Forest Service Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) program tracks these ongoing changes — every year, across the nation — as a forest health check up. The 2018…  More 

Uncovering Urban Forests

The scope of forest-pest risk analysis research is often limited to natural forests. Neglected are those tree communities called urban forests: trees within the boundaries of a city or populated area. Urban trees see a significant proportion of the impacts from invasive pests. Their unnatural distribution and close proximity to transported goods and other means…  More 

Government-Academic Partnership Gathers Tick Data

As an intern with the USDA Forest Service, I’ve had my fair share of run-ins with ticks. My first trip into the field took me deep into a relatively untamed forest. The other three interns tagging along were surprisingly serene about the bounty of insects and spiderwebs everywhere; I was constantly swatting away bugs and…  More 

Call for Abstracts: the 2019 FIA Stakeholders Science Meeting

The USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (FIA) and NCASI are pleased to announce that registration is now open for the 2019 FIA Stakeholders Science Meeting to be held November 19-21, 2019 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The meeting will bring together international forest scientists, managers, and stakeholders to share insights on contemporary issues, science…  More 

Regional Participants Gather at the Fourth Experimental Forest Workshop

About 30 USDA Forest Service scientists gathered in Raleigh, North Carolina this month for the fourth workshop in a series about reinvigorating the SRS network of Experimental Forest and Range sites. The group included 17 SRS scientists, in addition to FIA, EFR sabbatical recipients, university collaborators, and two partners from the Southern Region of the…  More 

The State of U.S. Forests

The U.S. forest products industry accounts for approximately four percent of the nation’s total manufacturing GDP, producing over $200 billion in products every year. To keep tabs on the condition and status of America’s forest resources over time, the USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis Program compiles the official estimates for all public and private forest lands in…  More 

How Tree Diversity Affects Invasive Forest Pests

“Invasive insects and diseases pose both ecological and economic threats to our forest ecosystems,” says Qinfeng Guo, USDA Forest Service research ecologist. Guo is the lead author of a broad-scale study of U.S. forest data that examines the relationship between the number of native tree species and the number of nonnative forest pests. Across their…  More 

Trees in Protected Areas

Conservation goals range anywhere from aesthetics to survival. Among the most important of those is ensuring that an ecosystem is resilient to disturbances and provides as many different functions as possible. According to an assessment by a USDA Forest Service cooperating researcher, those qualities can be quantified using two metrics: rarity and evolutionary distinctiveness. Rarity…  More