The Forest Health Advisory System

The U.S. Forest Service Forest Health Protection recently developed the Forest Health Advisory System, a web-based application that highlights potential future activities of more than 40 major forest pests and pathogens across 1.2 billion acres of U.S. forest land. Through a simple web interface on the front page of the web application, a user can…  More 

Good News for Eradicating Cogongrass in the South

Over the past decade, U.S. Forest Service researchers have been working with university cooperators to find some way to slow down or stop the relentless spread of cogongrass. This last fall, Auburn University researchers reported results that demonstrate, for the first time, that patches of cogongrass can be eliminated completely within three years — showing…  More 

Where Does That Infested Firewood Come From?

The spread of damaging invasive forest pests such as the emerald ash borer is only partially powered by the insects’ own wings. People moving firewood for camping can hasten and widen the spread of insects and resulting forest destruction. A new U.S. Forest Service study provides a tool for anticipating the most likely route of human-assisted spread, giving…  More 

The Future of Invasive Insects and Diseases in Southern Forests

The Southern Forest Futures Project (SFFP) started in 2008 as an effort to study and understand the various forces reshaping the forests across the 13 states of the Southeast. Chartered by the U.S. Forest Service Southern Region and Southern Research Station, along with the Southern Group of State Foresters, the project examines a variety of…  More 

Symposium Update: Natural Disturbances and Historic Range of Variation

Over 60 land managers, scientists, students, and professors attended a recent symposium on natural disturbances and historic range of variation. The symposium was held at the annual meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, and organized by Cathryn Greenberg, project leader of the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station Upland Hardwood Ecology and Management unit,…  More 

International Researchers Mobilize Against Risky Stowaway Pests

Sometimes there’s more to global trade than meets the eye. While consumers and economies may benefit from expanding market opportunities and a seemingly endless array of readily available goods, harmful pests could be lurking as people and products are transported between countries. An international research network, including scientists from the U.S. Forest Service, has come…  More 

Slowing the Spread of Thousand Cankers Disease

U.S. Forest Service researchers have confirmed the efficacy of a heat treatment schedule that eliminates the insect and fungus that cause thousand cankers disease from black walnut logs. Information included in the recently published research article by Forest Service Southern Research Station research entomologist Bud Mayfield and fellow authors provides managers and the public with…  More 

Southeastern Climate Hub to Provide Practical, Science-Based Information to Farmers, Ranchers and Forest Landowners

On February 5, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the creation of the first ever Regional Hubs for Risk Adaptation and Mitigation to Climate Change at seven locations around the country. “Climate Hubs” will address increasing risks such as fires, invasive pests, devastating floods, and crippling droughts on a regional basis, aiming to translate science and…  More 

Rising Temperatures Permit Expansion of Southern Pine Beetle Into New Jersey

The New York Times recently ran a front page story about the damaging spread of southern pine beetle through the New Jersey Pinelands. The article included an interview with Dartmouth biologist Matt Ayres, who talked about how rising temperatures allowed the insect pest to thrive in an area where cold winters once killed it. Ayres’…  More 

Korean Forests Gain Ground with U.S. Forest Service Support

Korean forest scientists know all too well how degraded forests affect ecosystems and people. During the 20th century, unsustainable harvesting and conversion of forests to cropland caused “serious social and environmental problems like lack of fuel, severe flooding, and droughts,” according to the Korea Forest Service. In the 1970s, the country began a widespread forest…  More