Reflections on the Southern Forest Futures Project

In 2008, we started the Southern Forest Futures Project with 15 public workshops held in each of the 13 States of our region. In Baton Rouge, Asheville, Stillwater, Charleston, and all the other locations, we discussed and compiled the concerns of more than 700 resource professionals and other interested  citizens regarding the great and vast…  More 

Economic Assessment of Mountain Pine Beetle Timber Salvage

Forest Service study finds that increased timber salvage of trees killed by mountain pine beetle would benefit some areas in the West but not others. A recently published study by U.S. Forest Service researchers evaluates potential revenues from harvesting standing timber killed by mountain pine beetle in the western United States. The study shows that…  More 

The Center for Integrated Forest Science

A Pioneering Research Model Over the past 40 years, forest science has evolved from more traditional “forestry” science with a near exclusive focus on enhancing forest productivity to a science that must address broader and more complex topics such as sustaining ecosystem services in the face of land use change, climate variability, and altered disturbance…  More 

Key Findings from the U.S. Forest Service National Climate Assessment

U.S. Forest Service Research and Development recently published a comprehensive synthesis of the effects of climate change on U.S. Forests . Led and edited by Forest Service scientists Jim Vose (Southern Research Station), Dave Peterson (Pacific Northwest Research Station), and Toral Patel-Weynand (Forest Service Research & Development), the report includes chapters written by experts from…  More 

Tracking Those Other Forest Products

Timber is certainly the best-known forest product, but since before the time of European settlement, people have harvested other plants from the forests for a wide range of purposes. The U.S. Forest Service National Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program has assessed timber product output (TPO) for more than 60 years by surveying the primary producers of industrial…  More 

Where’s the Ginseng?

Newly published research by the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) demonstrates that co-managing eastern hardwood forests for timber and non-timber forest products could boost local economies while helping conserve biodiversity. SRS scientist Jim Chamberlain worked with Michael McGufffin, president of the American Herbal Products Association (AHPA) and Virginia Tech associate professor Stephen Prisley…  More 

Hot Time in the City

In Georgia, U.S. Forest Service scientists and cooperators are mapping out climate change vulnerability at the county level. Their results suggest that people who live in metro Atlanta are at most risk of disruptions from the rising temperatures and extreme weather events of recent decades — and that this vulnerability could persist well into the future. Cassandra…  More 

New Business for a Small Alabama Town

Economic conditions from 2005 to 2010 meant bad news for much of the South’s forest industry, accelerating mill closings and job losses in small towns across the southern United States. Recently, the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) unit of the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station worked with a leading manufacturer to bring good news…  More 

McDonough Wins Engineer of the Year

  Mark McDonough, station engineer for the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS), was recently named Managerial Engineer of the Year for 2012 in recognition of his leadership in sustainable operations and products, implementation of valuable engineering strategies, and the successful management of one of the largest capital improvements programs in Forest Service Research…  More 

Eucalyptus in the South

Because it grows rapidly and can develop high wood density, there’s increasing interest in the South for growing Eucalyptus commercially as a bioenergy feedstock. For the South, this means finding and testing Eucalyptus species that will grow in temperate areas as well as genetically modified hybrids bred to be frost tolerant. Growing well under a…  More