Susan Loeb Wins Lifetime Achievement Award

In February, U.S. Forest Service research ecologist Susan Loeb received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network at the organization’s 19th annual meeting held in Nacogdoches, Texas. Loeb was honored for the decades of research on bat ecology and conservation she has conducted as a Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) scientist. Loeb,…  More 

SRS Researchers Awarded Grants for Research on White Nose Syndrome

U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) researchers and collaborators just received news that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) funded two of their proposals on white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that affects hibernating bats. One grant funds research on bat survival, while the other helps set up a program to monitor bats nationwide.…  More 

Leaf Litter Keeps Ground-Roosting Eastern Red Bats Warm

When winter weather arrives, most bats hibernate in caves, but a few species migrate to warmer areas. Warmer being relative, the migrating bats may still end up in places that are too cold for comfort, and sometimes hibernate under leaf litter for short periods of time. Roger Perry, U.S. Forest Service researcher, studied these temporary…  More 

Managing Southern Forests under Climate Change

U.S. Forest Service scientists recently published a new comprehensive guide to help natural resource managers in the South develop options for managing southern forest ecosystems in the face of climate change.  Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Management Options: A Guide for Natural Resource Managers in Southern Forest Ecosystems culminates a multi-year initiative by Forest Service Southern…  More 

Slowing the Spread of White Nose Syndrome in Bats

Since 2006, a newly discovered fungal disease referred to as white-nose syndrome has killed millions of North American bats. U.S. Forest Service researchers, along with researchers from other Federal and state agencies and universities have been investigating the fungus and its devastating effects on bats since the disease was first noticed. Roger Perry, a research…  More 

Ramped Up Risk for Frogs When Chinese Tallow Interacts with Climate Change

The timing of mating and egg-laying in many amphibians is directly related to temperature. Due to climate change, spring warming comes sooner in many areas, and a new study led by U.S. Forest Service researcher Daniel Saenz suggests that the changed timing of breeding could cause native amphibians such as the southern leopard frog and…  More 

Acorns: The Forest’s Bread and Butter

  Acorns are often referred to as “a keystone species of the forest” because of the critical role they play in ecosystem dynamics. Rodents feed heavily on acorns and, in turn, predators such as foxes and hawks prey on rodent populations plump from acorn feasting. Deer and black bears depend on acorns too. In fact,…  More 

Future Wilderness Area Benefits from Clean Air Act

A newly published report by the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station shows that soil conditions in two Western North Carolina wilderness areas will keep improving over the next century as a result of continued reductions in air pollution resulting from the implementation of the Clean Air Act and other ongoing air pollution emission reductions.…  More 

SRS Director Highlights Traditional Knowledge During Science Café

Forest health is necessary for life, but the nation’s forested lands are slowly disappearing.  How can we sustain our nation’s forests and their numerous benefits? We can use all available knowledge, both Western and traditional, to understand and address forest management issues. “You can learn from living on the land for centuries,” said Southern Research…  More 

Reflections on the Southern Forest Futures Project

In 2008, we started the Southern Forest Futures Project with 15 public workshops held in each of the 13 States of our region. In Baton Rouge, Asheville, Stillwater, Charleston, and all the other locations, we discussed and compiled the concerns of more than 700 resource professionals and other interested  citizens regarding the great and vast…  More