Life in the Rubbish: Crayfish Habitat in the Mississippi Yazoo River Basin

Crayfish – also called crawfish, crawdads, or mudbugs, depending on where you live – look like tiny lobsters, and live in freshwater rivers and streams. Crayfish need instream cover to hide from predators – and from larger, cannibalistic kin. They also use cover to find food, to shelter while incubating eggs, and to keep themselves…  More 

Appalachian-Cumberland Highlands: The Next 50 Years

Knowing more about how the future might unfold can improve decisions that have long-term consequences. The Southern Forest Futures Project, a multi-agency effort led by the U.S. Forest Service, aims to forecast and interpret changes in southern forests under multiple scenarios over the next several decades. The first of five sub-regional reports to explore these…  More 

Workshop April 30 – May 1: Fire Management and Quality of Bat Habitat

  Register now: “Relationships between Fire Management and the Quality of Habitat for Bats: A Workshop for Scientists and Land Managers”   Prescribed fires in mixed-oak forests are thought to improve bat foraging habitat, outweighing the risks from smoke and heat exposure during fires. However, relatively few studies about the relationships between fire and habitat…  More 

Long-Term Response of a Forest Watershed Ecosystem

A new book edited by U.S. Forest Service emeritus scientist Wayne Swank and Virginia Tech professor Jack Webster and published by Oxford University Press brings together findings from more than 30 years of collaborative research by the Forest Service and the National Science Foundation (NSF) Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program on the Coweeta Experimental…  More 

Susan Loeb Wins Lifetime Achievement Award

In February, U.S. Forest Service research ecologist Susan Loeb received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network at the organization’s 19th annual meeting held in Nacogdoches, Texas. Loeb was honored for the decades of research on bat ecology and conservation she has conducted as a Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) scientist. Loeb,…  More 

SRS Researchers Awarded Grants for Research on White Nose Syndrome

U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) researchers and collaborators just received news that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) funded two of their proposals on white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease that affects hibernating bats. One grant funds research on bat survival, while the other helps set up a program to monitor bats nationwide.…  More 

Leaf Litter Keeps Ground-Roosting Eastern Red Bats Warm

When winter weather arrives, most bats hibernate in caves, but a few species migrate to warmer areas. Warmer being relative, the migrating bats may still end up in places that are too cold for comfort, and sometimes hibernate under leaf litter for short periods of time. Roger Perry, U.S. Forest Service researcher, studied these temporary…  More 

Managing Southern Forests under Climate Change

U.S. Forest Service scientists recently published a new comprehensive guide to help natural resource managers in the South develop options for managing southern forest ecosystems in the face of climate change.  Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Management Options: A Guide for Natural Resource Managers in Southern Forest Ecosystems culminates a multi-year initiative by Forest Service Southern…  More 

Slowing the Spread of White Nose Syndrome in Bats

Since 2006, a newly discovered fungal disease referred to as white-nose syndrome has killed millions of North American bats. U.S. Forest Service researchers, along with researchers from other Federal and state agencies and universities have been investigating the fungus and its devastating effects on bats since the disease was first noticed. Roger Perry, a research…  More 

Ramped Up Risk for Frogs When Chinese Tallow Interacts with Climate Change

The timing of mating and egg-laying in many amphibians is directly related to temperature. Due to climate change, spring warming comes sooner in many areas, and a new study led by U.S. Forest Service researcher Daniel Saenz suggests that the changed timing of breeding could cause native amphibians such as the southern leopard frog and…  More