Ephemeral Wetlands and Climate Change: Implications for Frogs and Toads

Many frog and toad species live on land as adults, but their lives always begin in water. Depending on the species, dozens or hundreds of eggs, bound together into a gelatinous glob or string, are laid in a pond, puddle, or marsh. When frogs and toads spawn in waters inhabited by fish, many of the…  More 

Heat and Acid Could Squeeze Trout Out of Southern Appalachian Streams

A newly published research study that combines effects of warming temperatures from climate change with stream acidity projects average losses of around 10 percent of stream habitat for coldwater aquatic species for seven national forests in the southern Appalachians – and up to a 20 percent loss of habitat in the Pisgah and Nantahala National…  More 

Burning the Leafy Blanket: Winter Prescribed Fire and Litter-Roosting Bats

Rather than hibernating in caves, some bat species in the southeastern U.S. get through the coldest parts of winter by roosting under fallen leaves, twigs, and other dead plant material on the forest floor. Although this leaf litter protects bats from the cold, it could also put them at risk of being injured or killed…  More 

Helping Aquatic Wildlife Managers Navigate the River of Streamflow Models

Streams in the southeastern U.S. are among the most ecologically rich in the world, but climate change, land cover change, and withdrawals threaten the health of their aquatic ecosystems. “Understanding how changes in streamflow affect aquatic wildlife is critical,” says U.S. Forest Service scientist Peter Caldwell. “Many states in the Southeast recognize the urgency of the issue and…  More 

U.S. Forest Service Publishes Plan for North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat)

Just published online by the Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS), A Plan for the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) provides detailed guidelines for participating in NABat, an international multiagency program created to provide the data needed to make effective decisions about bat populations across the North American continent. Susan Loeb, SRS research ecologist,…  More 

Changing Forest Conditions and Pollinator Decline

“Forests in North America have changed rapidly during the past century,” says U.S. Forest Service scientist Jim Hanula. Before European settlement, forests were a mosaic of open pine and hardwood forests, prairies, and woodland savannas. Recent studies have found that forests with sun-filled openings and those with open canopies (where the branches from adjacent trees…  More 

International Bat Monitoring Research Group Receives “Wings Across the Americas” Award

On March 9th, U.S. Forest Service scientist Susan Loeb and numerous partners were recognized with the Forest Service Wings Across the Americas Research Award for their contributions to the North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat). Wings Across the Americas is an international Forest Service program that works with a wide range of partners in the…  More 

Little Brown Bats of Alaska

Bats do live in southcentral Alaska, that much is known. But the list of unknowns is longer.  Which species live there? What habitats do they prefer? Where do they roost? What are their foraging habits? A recent U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) study begins to fill the information void about Alaskan bats. SRS scientist Susan Loeb,…  More 

Freshwater Crayfish in Peril Worldwide

In early January, scientists led by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) published results of a global assessment that shows that almost a third of the world’s species of crayfish are threatened with extinction. U.S. Forest Service aquatic ecologist Susie Adams was a co-author on the report and provided important information about North American crayfish…  More 

Conservation and Management of Eastern Big-Eared Bats

Published in 2012, the U.S. Forest Service publication Conservation and Management of Eastern Big-Eared Bats  brings together the latest knowledge about eastern big-eared bats. Edited by Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) researcher Susan Loeb, University of Kentucky professor Michael Lacki, and Weyerhauser manager Darren Miller, the publication features proceedings from a 2010 symposium. The publication…  More