Cave Climates and White-Nose Syndrome

  White-nose syndrome, caused by the fungus Geomyces destructans, has decimated bat populations throughout eastern North America. Recent estimates show that 6 to7 million bats have succumbed to white-nose syndrome. This fungus thrives in the cool, moist conditions found in many caves and mines where bats may also hibernate. Roger W. Perry, a research wildlife…  More 

There’s Nothing Simple about the Urban-Rural Interface

A new book edited by U.S. Forest Service researcher Wayne Zipperer, with co-editors David Laband and Graeme Lockaby, focuses on urban-rural interfaces—those places where city and suburban development touch on the countryside. Published by the American Society of Agronomy, the Crop Science Society of America, and the Soil Science Society of America, the articles in…  More 

New Books on Forest Landscape Restoration

Two new books link natural and social sciences U.S. Forest Service scientists made significant contributions to two related books recently published by Springer:  Forest Landscape Restoration: Integrating Natural and Social Sciences and A Goal-Oriented Approach to Forest landscape Restoration. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) scientist John Stanturf served as lead editor on both books,…  More 

How Did the Fish Get Across the Road?

Early in the morning, a crew is gearing up for another day. Dip nets, waders, buckets, snorkeling gear and measuring devices are loaded into the truck. Off they go on another assignment—another stream to survey, monitoring equipment to install, aquatic organisms to inventory, stream crossings to photograph.  After a long drive back to the office, the…  More 

Climate Change Projected to Alter Indiana Bat Maternity Range

Research by U.S. Forest Service scientists forecasts profound changes over the next 50 years in the summer range of the endangered Indiana bat, one of many eastern bat species whose numbers are already decreasing due to white-nose syndrome and other factors. In an article published in the journal Ecology and Evolution, Forest Service Southern Research…  More 

Invasive Tallow Tree Lowers Frog Egg Survival

  Aquatic “mesocosm” used to test effects of tallow tree litter on southern leopard frog eggs. Photo by Cory Adams. Amphibians across the world are rapidly declining. Numerous studies have addressed causes of the decline, but very few have looked at the effects of invasive plants. Dan Saenz, Southern Research Station (SRS) research wildlife biologist…  More 

North American Freshwater Mussels

New Book Highlights Natural History, Ecology, and Conservation A new book by Southern Research Station (SRS) scientist Wendell Haag provides the first comprehensive view of the ecology and conservation of the approximately 300 species of North American freshwater mussels. Intended for resource managers, scientists, students, and those interested in natural history, North American Freshwater Mussels…  More 

Prescribed Fire in the Piney Woods

Effects on amphibians and reptiles Forest managers across North America use prescribed burning for many reasons—restoring ecosystem functions, improving wildlife habitat, reducing wildlife hazard, to name a few. Prescribed fire can have both beneficial and negative effects on specific plants and animals. Managers are increasingly sensitive to possible effects of fire on amphibians and reptiles…  More 

Taking America’s Rarest Snake Back to the Woods

Louisiana pine snakes released on Kisatchie National Forest On May 1, USDA Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, the Memphis Zoo, and other partners released seven young Louisiana pine snakes on a restored longleaf pine stand in the Kisatchie National Forest in Louisiana. The release is the fourth…  More 

The Santee Experimental Forest at 75

On a cool spring day deep in the forest a short drive away from Charleston, South Carolina, more than 100 people showed up to celebrate 75 years of continual research at the  Forest Service Santee Experimental Forest (the Santee), one of 19 experimental forests maintained by the Southern Research Station (SRS). Established in 1937, the 6,100-acre…  More