Slowing the Spread of White Nose Syndrome in Bats

Since 2006, a newly discovered fungal disease referred to as white-nose syndrome has killed millions of North American bats. U.S. Forest Service researchers, along with researchers from other Federal and state agencies and universities have been investigating the fungus and its devastating effects on bats since the disease was first noticed. Roger Perry, a research…  More 

Ramped Up Risk for Frogs When Chinese Tallow Interacts with Climate Change

The timing of mating and egg-laying in many amphibians is directly related to temperature. Due to climate change, spring warming comes sooner in many areas, and a new study led by U.S. Forest Service researcher Daniel Saenz suggests that the changed timing of breeding could cause native amphibians such as the southern leopard frog and…  More 

Acorns: The Forest’s Bread and Butter

  Acorns are often referred to as “a keystone species of the forest” because of the critical role they play in ecosystem dynamics. Rodents feed heavily on acorns and, in turn, predators such as foxes and hawks prey on rodent populations plump from acorn feasting. Deer and black bears depend on acorns too. In fact,…  More 

Future Wilderness Area Benefits from Clean Air Act

A newly published report by the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station shows that soil conditions in two Western North Carolina wilderness areas will keep improving over the next century as a result of continued reductions in air pollution resulting from the implementation of the Clean Air Act and other ongoing air pollution emission reductions.…  More 

SRS Director Highlights Traditional Knowledge During Science Café

Forest health is necessary for life, but the nation’s forested lands are slowly disappearing.  How can we sustain our nation’s forests and their numerous benefits? We can use all available knowledge, both Western and traditional, to understand and address forest management issues. “You can learn from living on the land for centuries,” said Southern Research…  More 

Reflections on the Southern Forest Futures Project

In 2008, we started the Southern Forest Futures Project with 15 public workshops held in each of the 13 States of our region. In Baton Rouge, Asheville, Stillwater, Charleston, and all the other locations, we discussed and compiled the concerns of more than 700 resource professionals and other interested  citizens regarding the great and vast…  More 

Cutting Trees for the Early Birds

U.S. Forest Service scientists recently published the results of one of the longest studies conducted on the effects of multiple forest harvest methods on early successional bird species. Published online in Forest Ecology and Management, the article by Forest Service Southern Research Station research wildlife biologist Roger Perry and retired scientist Ron Thill presents findings…  More 

Finding Out More About Native Bees

When people think about bees, it’s often honeybees that come to mind. Native to Eurasia, honeybees pollinate apple, peach and almond trees, watermelons, cucumbers, and many other food crops. In many areas, beekeepers take to the highway with their colonies, traveling to whatever crop is blooming and in need of pollination. “Honeybees are an agricultural…  More 

Tracking Bees on Experimental Forests

At first sight, the nine plastic cups in a grassy yard at Bent Creek Experimental Forest don’t look like part of a nationwide monitoring survey. But the cups are actually simple bee traps, and a number of U.S. Forest Service facilities are part of a network of bee monitoring stations that stretch across the country.…  More 

Agencies Join Forces to Host Red-cockaded Woodpecker Short Course

This spring, U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station wildlife biologist Cory Adams joined forces with Cliff Shackelford  from Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, and Robert Allen from the US Fish and Wildlife Service to teach 16 individuals from 5 consulting firms about the red-cockaded woodpecker, a federally listed endangered species found in fire-maintained mature pine…  More