Little Rock Hosts International Silviculture Workshop

On May 31st, over 50 researchers from the United States, China, Germany, Slovenia, Chile, Germany, Poland, Finland, the Czech Republic, Switzerland, Canada, Belgium, and the United Kingdom descended upon Little Rock, Arkansas to discuss forestry management techniques from around the world at the 10th International Workshop on Uneven-aged Silviculture. Jim Guldin, project leader for both of…  More 

Water Yields from Southern Appalachian Watersheds in Decline since the 1970s

Where would we be without the water we get from cool mountain streams? In the densely populated southeastern U.S., forested watersheds are particularly important to drinking water supplies. Recent estimates show that southern forests deliver surface drinking water to some 48.7 million people, with streams from the mountainous Southern Appalachian region alone providing water supplies…  More 

Managing for Natural Disturbances in Central Hardwood Forests

A recently published book edited by U.S. Forest Service researcher Katie Greenberg and Western Carolina University professor Beverly Collins offers detailed science-based information about the history of natural disturbances in the Central Hardwood Region of the U.S., and provides insight for managers and ecologists on managing the area’s forests. Published by Springer, Natural Disturbances and Historic Range of…  More 

2016 Southern Pine Silviculture Training Held in Arkansas and Louisiana

For 10 straights days from 25 April through May 3, U.S. Forest Service personnel from the Southern Research Station, Region 8, and State and Private Forestry (S&PF) taught a short course on southern pine silviculture as part of the National Advanced Silviculture Program (NASP). The silviculture certification program for the Forest Service, NASP consists of…  More 

Years After Apollo 14, Moon Pines Continue to Travel Around the World

Apollo 14 landed on the moon in 1971, the third manned mission to land on Earth’s only natural satellite. The spacecraft carried an unusual cargo – tree seeds. Astronaut Stuart Roosa — previously a smoke jumper for the U.S. Forest Service — carried several hundred seeds from loblolly pine and four other tree species with him on the…  More 

The Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory

Much of what we know today about the hydrology of forested watersheds was learned through early research at the U.S. Forest Service Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory (Coweeta). Established in 1933 as the Coweeta Experimental Forest, the laboratory represents the longest continuous environmental study on any landscape in North America, as well as one of the oldest…  More 

SEEDS for the Future

During April 13-16, 2016, scientists and staff at the U.S. Forest Service Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory hosted the Strategies for Ecological Education and Diversity (SEEDS) 11th annual leadership meeting. An award-winning program of the Ecological Society of America (ESA), SEEDS focuses on students at the undergraduate level, with the mission to diversify and advance the ecology profession…  More 

Open or Shut: How Trees Respond to Drought at the Leaf Level

Trees pull water into their roots, where some of it moves up the trunk against the pull of gravity. This upward movement, which is described by the cohesion-tension theory, is possible because of the chemical nature of water. Water molecules are attracted to each other (cohesion), so just before a water molecule evaporates from the…  More 

Fires, Fuels, and Longleaf Pine in the Western Gulf Region

On April 6, 2016, scientists from the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station (SRS) presented findings on prescribed fire, longleaf pine, and other topics during an all-day workshop titled “Louisiana Fire, Fuels, and Longleaf Pine Management: Lessons from the Kisatchie National Forest and the Palustris Experimental Forest.” Mary Anne S. Sayer, SRS research plant physiologist…  More 

The Complexities of Longleaf Pine Cone Production

“Longleaf pine forests are among the most important ecosystems in the southeastern United States,” says U.S. Forest Service research ecologist Qinfeng Guo. “However, they have declined dramatically since European settlement and are considered endangered.” Longleaf pine ecosystems once covered an estimated 80 to 90 million acres across the southeastern U.S. – from Virginia to Texas – but…  More