Mapping Species Invasions

Forest Service scientists help organize international meeting. Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center research ecologist Frank Koch and Northern Research Station research biologist Robert Venette, and international colleagues co-organized the sixth annual International Pest Risk Mapping Workgroup (IPRMW) held July 23-26 in Norway. The IPRMW is a group of like-minded scientists focused on improving the…  More 

Seeing Forest Stress from Drought in Real Time

Most climate change models predict drier and warmer conditions across parts of the southern United States, which may translate into more frequent and severe drought events for those areas. With an estimated 60 percent of the drinking water of the South coming from forested watersheds—and many forests already stressed—land managers need to start planning now…  More 

Nosing Out Future Landslides

In the mountains of Southern Appalachia, landslides sometimes follow major rainstorms. Increases in the frequency of heavy rainfall events predicted under climate change could ramp up the risk of landslides in an area where development and roads crawl up steep hillsides. In western North Carolina, the North Carolina Geological Survey  documented over 2,700 landslides and…  More 

Saving the Genetic Treasures of Southern Forests

People have saved seeds since the dawn of agriculture, but scientists at the Southern Research Station (SRS) are doing something new–combining modern genetics and the silvicultural strategy of seed orchards to preserve the genetic heritage of the South’s most at risk- and most ecologically important trees. Trees across the Southeast face exotic pests, shrinking ranges and…  More 

Trees in Transition

In forests as in life, the only constant is change. Forest species are ever adjusting to changing conditions resulting from seasonal fluctuations in temperature and precipitation, disturbances such as storms and wildfire, and interactions with other species. But typical temperature and precipitation patterns are now also changing; in some areas, climatic changes are occurring rather rapidly,…  More 

In the Long Run: The Coweeta LTER

  Coweeta Included in Special Journal Issue on LTER Network A special issue of the journal Bioscience released on April 6 focuses on more than 30 years of scientific findings from the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network, including those from the Southern Research Station (SRS) Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory (Coweeta). The National Science Foundation created the LTER…  More 

Following Carbon’s Trail in Longleaf Pines

Once covering some 90 million acres in the South, longleaf pine forests were the largest temperate forest type in the United States, but have been in decline for decades because of land clearing for crops and pastures, logging, and other land use changes. Longleaf pine ecosystems are some of the most diverse in the nation;…  More 

Manager Resources: The Climate Change Resource Center (CCRC)

Science You Can Use Are you a land manager wondering about what you can do about climate change? The Climate Change Resource Center (CCRC) can provide you with real, on-the-ground answers. Changing weather patterns already impact forests across the United States, and future effects are expected to be even greater. Although planning for future scenarios…  More 

SRS Publishes Global Change Research Strategy

In March 2012, the Southern Research Station (SRS) published the Southern Research Station Global Change Research Strategy, 2011-2019, a Science Update that outlines SRS research priorities over the next decade in relation to climate change. Southern forests are invaluable, providing essential goods and services to the region’s people. As just one example, forests filter about…  More 

TACCIMO: Making Science Accessible for Forest Planners

In early 2009, a group of researchers led by Steve McNulty, team leader with the Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center, partnered directly with forest planners from across the Southern Region of the National Forest System  to start looking at what needed to be done to address the looming problems posed by climate change. A…  More